OHA to change testing standards for marijuana products
#1
Temporary rules provide relief for industry, maintain public health protection

Contacts:
Jonathan Modie, OHA, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us
Mark Pettinger, OLCC, 503-872-5115, Mark.pettinger@oregon.gov
Chris Pair, Office of Governor Kate Brown, 503-559-5938, Chris.PAIR@oregon.gov

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) announced today it is modifying testing standards for medical and recreational marijuana products with new, temporary rules that balance testing costs for the marijuana industry with public health protection for consumers.
Governor Kate Brown requested agencies to develop the temporary rules so producers and processors can test fewer samples, which is expected to lower costs and create a more efficient process. The temporary rules take effect today, Friday, Dec. 2.
OHA is responsible for adopting testing standards for marijuana products that are necessary to protect public health and safety. These standards must take into account how the costs of testing will affect the cost to marijuana consumers.

Highlights of the temporary rules:
Replaces process validation with control study
  • Cuts three process validation tests to one control study. 
  • A processor with a process lot that passes one control study can combine samples into one composite sample, plus a field duplicate for testing, for one year, unless the manufacturing of the product changes. 
Removes alcohol-based solvents from testing requirement
  • Butanol, propanol and ethanol are removed from solvent analyte list. 
Combines some batches for testing
  • Samples from multiple batches may be combined for the purposes of testing for THC and CBD if the batches are the same strain.
  • Samples from multiple batches, even if different strains, may be combined for the purposes of testing for pesticides if the total weight of the batches does not exceed 10 pounds. 
Changes variance for potency testing of edibles
  • Increases the amount of homogeneity variance in edible products to plus five percent (+ 5%).
Changes labeling for potency
  • The THC and CDB amount required to be on a label must be within plus or minus five percent of the value calculated by the laboratory. 
Since OHA permanent testing rules became enforceable on Oct. 1, 2016, the marijuana industry has reported to regulating authorities that testing costs are driving up consumer prices, creating product shortages, and causing some processors to temporarily cease operations and furlough employees.
“The Governor has been clear about the importance of the marijuana industry to Oregon’s economy,” said Jeff Rhoades, marijuana policy adviser, Office of Governor Kate Brown. “This approach keeps Oregonians employed, prevents marijuana product from slipping back into the illegal market, and continues to protect public health and safety.”

Oregon labs have notified OHA of a total of 307 samples taken from marijuana products—from dried flower to extracts—that failed for either pesticides, solvents or both since Oct. 1, 2016. 
Andre Ourso, manager of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program at OHA, says he’s confident the temporary emergency rules will immediately alleviate some of the regulatory burden on the industry while still ensuring that cannabis is reasonably safe for consumers and patients.

“OHA understood the difficult situation that cannabis producers and growers were in with regard to the authority’s Oct 1. testing regulations,” Ourso said. “OHA looks forward to working with the Governor’s Office and its sister agencies in developing permanent testing rules in the near future that protect the public from harmful substances, such as illegal pesticides, yet allow for the cannabis industry to succeed in a robust regulatory environment.”
For more information, visit the OHA website at: www.healthoregon.org/ommp.

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#2
They need to just break it down into different grades

Grade A fully tested in certified lab

Grade B locally tested at high school lab

Grade C tested by Tommy Chong.
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#3
I didn't have to use anything to kill bugs. But I did chase white butterflies around and kill them like some lunatic.
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#4
(12-02-2016, 10:08 PM)tvguy Wrote: I didn't have to use anything to kill bugs. But I did chase white butterflies around and kill them like some lunatic.

With chopsticks?



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#5
(12-02-2016, 10:08 PM)tvguy Wrote: I didn't have to use anything to kill bugs. But I did chase white butterflies around and kill them like some lunatic.

That is true.
Pot is it own pesticide.

indoor gardens have issues with spider mites.
 from poor air circulation.
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#6
(12-02-2016, 11:13 PM)chuck white Wrote:
(12-02-2016, 10:08 PM)tvguy Wrote: I didn't have to use anything to kill bugs. But I did chase white butterflies around and kill them like some lunatic.

That is true.
Pot is it own pesticide.

indoor gardens have issues with spider mites.
 from poor air circulation.
The local place sells the predators for that so still no need for pesticides.
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#7
(12-03-2016, 08:15 AM)orygunluvr Wrote:
(12-02-2016, 11:13 PM)chuck white Wrote:
(12-02-2016, 10:08 PM)tvguy Wrote: I didn't have to use anything to kill bugs. But I did chase white butterflies around and kill them like some lunatic.

That is true.
Pot is it own pesticide.

indoor gardens have issues with spider mites.
 from poor air circulation.
The local place sells the predators for that so still no need for pesticides.
Test for the predator pooped produced? Cool
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#8
(12-02-2016, 11:04 PM)Valuesize Wrote:
(12-02-2016, 10:08 PM)tvguy Wrote: I didn't have to use anything to kill bugs. But I did chase white butterflies around and kill them like some lunatic.

With chopsticks?




Bwa ha.. That's funny.
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#9
(12-02-2016, 11:13 PM)chuck white Wrote:
(12-02-2016, 10:08 PM)tvguy Wrote: I didn't have to use anything to kill bugs. But I did chase white butterflies around and kill them like some lunatic.

That is true.
Pot is it own pesticide.

indoor gardens have issues with spider mites.
 from poor air circulation.

Yeah so do some outdoor gardens. My neighbor has his plants in the ground close to a fence. Mine were in containers on pallets. So the base of the plants were about 2 feet off the ground. Also they were out in the open and were practically brutalized by the strong evening winds I get so often.
Anyway he gets spider mites and I don't. Big Grin
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#10
PORTLAND, Ore.—Physicians should provide medical marijuana patients a level of care that, at minimum, includes a full evaluation, treatment and follow-up plan, with documentation in the patient’s medical record, when recommending the drug’s use, according to a new Oregon Health Authority report.
A report presented this month to the Oregon Legislature, HB 4014 Clinical Guidelines Work Group: Guidelines for Attending Physicians When Recommending the Medical Use of Marijuana, provides recommendations to physicians on appropriate care of a patient diagnosed with one or more debilitating conditions for which the physician is recommending the medical use of marijuana.
Qualifying debilitating conditions include cancer; glaucoma; a degenerative or pervasive neurological condition; positive HIV or AIDS status; or a side effect related to treating these conditions. Also qualifying are a medical condition or treatment for a condition that produces cachexia; severe pain; severe nausea; seizures; persistent muscle spasms; or post-traumatic stress disorder.
The Clinical Guidelines Work Group, created when the Legislature passed House Bill 4014 in 2016, developed the guidelines with the principals that physicians who recommend medical marijuana to a patient engage in the practice of medicine and do so within the context of a bona-fide physician-patient relationship.
“What this report is saying is that patients for whom medical use of marijuana is recommended deserve the same minimum level of care as those prescribed any medication to treat a debilitating condition,” said Andre Ourso, manager of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program at the OHA Public Health Division.
The work group consisted of 10 allopathic and osteopathic physicians and a patient advocate, as well as Ourso and state health officer Katrina Hedberg, MD, as ex-officio members.
Patient evaluation includes obtaining a comprehensive medical history, and performing a complete physical examination appropriate to the patient’s debilitating medical condition and medical history, the report states. The physician should develop a written treatment plan, including documentation of informed consent, and discuss risks and benefits. The physician should follow up with the treatment plan, conduct ongoing evaluation and treatment, and properly maintain and document health records.
The report also notes that the work group “strongly opposes the smoking of marijuana as a means of therapeutic delivery” because of harms associated with inhaling any kind of smoke, and that several other delivery options are available that pose less risk to patient health.
“Marijuana smoke, like smoke from a cigarette or a wood-burning stove, contains particulate matter, much of which is potentially bad for the lungs, so we do not recommend a patient consume marijuana by smoking it,” Hedberg said.
In addition, physicians should advise patients to consume the lowest possible amount of marijuana to achieve discussed treatment goals, according to the guidelines. They also recommend physicians consider the potential negative health effects of using marijuana while also using opioids, and it refers physicians to Oregon’s Opioid Prescribing Guidelines.
The report is available at http://healthoregon.org/marijuana under “Publications.”
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#11
(02-15-2017, 10:15 AM)Valuesize Wrote: PORTLAND, Ore.—Physicians should provide medical marijuana patients a level of care that, at minimum, includes a full evaluation, treatment and follow-up plan, with documentation in the patient’s medical record, when recommending the drug’s use, according to a new Oregon Health Authority report.
A report presented this month to the Oregon Legislature, HB 4014 Clinical Guidelines Work Group: Guidelines for Attending Physicians When Recommending the Medical Use of Marijuana, provides recommendations to physicians on appropriate care of a patient diagnosed with one or more debilitating conditions for which the physician is recommending the medical use of marijuana.
Qualifying debilitating conditions include cancer; glaucoma; a degenerative or pervasive neurological condition; positive HIV or AIDS status; or a side effect related to treating these conditions. Also qualifying are a medical condition or treatment for a condition that produces cachexia; severe pain; severe nausea; seizures; persistent muscle spasms; or post-traumatic stress disorder.
The Clinical Guidelines Work Group, created when the Legislature passed House Bill 4014 in 2016, developed the guidelines with the principals that physicians who recommend medical marijuana to a patient engage in the practice of medicine and do so within the context of a bona-fide physician-patient relationship.
“What this report is saying is that patients for whom medical use of marijuana is recommended deserve the same minimum level of care as those prescribed any medication to treat a debilitating condition,” said Andre Ourso, manager of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program at the OHA Public Health Division.
The work group consisted of 10 allopathic and osteopathic physicians and a patient advocate, as well as Ourso and state health officer Katrina Hedberg, MD, as ex-officio members.
Patient evaluation includes obtaining a comprehensive medical history, and performing a complete physical examination appropriate to the patient’s debilitating medical condition and medical history, the report states. The physician should develop a written treatment plan, including documentation of informed consent, and discuss risks and benefits. The physician should follow up with the treatment plan, conduct ongoing evaluation and treatment, and properly maintain and document health records.
The report also notes that the work group “strongly opposes the smoking of marijuana as a means of therapeutic delivery” because of harms associated with inhaling any kind of smoke, and that several other delivery options are available that pose less risk to patient health.
“Marijuana smoke, like smoke from a cigarette or a wood-burning stove, contains particulate matter, much of which is potentially bad for the lungs, so we do not recommend a patient consume marijuana by smoking it,” Hedberg said.
In addition, physicians should advise patients to consume the lowest possible amount of marijuana to achieve discussed treatment goals, according to the guidelines. They also recommend physicians consider the potential negative health effects of using marijuana while also using opioids, and it refers physicians to Oregon’s Opioid Prescribing Guidelines.
The report is available at http://healthoregon.org/marijuana under “Publications.”

Sounds expensive. A lot of unnecessary medical bureaucracy.

I'm glad it's sold over the counter now and you don't need a prescription.
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#12
(02-15-2017, 09:15 PM)chuck white Wrote:
(02-15-2017, 10:15 AM)Valuesize Wrote: PORTLAND, Ore.—Physicians should provide medical marijuana patients a level of care that, at minimum, includes a full evaluation, treatment and follow-up plan, with documentation in the patient’s medical record, when recommending the drug’s use, according to a new Oregon Health Authority report.
A report presented this month to the Oregon Legislature, HB 4014 Clinical Guidelines Work Group: Guidelines for Attending Physicians When Recommending the Medical Use of Marijuana, provides recommendations to physicians on appropriate care of a patient diagnosed with one or more debilitating conditions for which the physician is recommending the medical use of marijuana.
Qualifying debilitating conditions include cancer; glaucoma; a degenerative or pervasive neurological condition; positive HIV or AIDS status; or a side effect related to treating these conditions. Also qualifying are a medical condition or treatment for a condition that produces cachexia; severe pain; severe nausea; seizures; persistent muscle spasms; or post-traumatic stress disorder.
The Clinical Guidelines Work Group, created when the Legislature passed House Bill 4014 in 2016, developed the guidelines with the principals that physicians who recommend medical marijuana to a patient engage in the practice of medicine and do so within the context of a bona-fide physician-patient relationship.
“What this report is saying is that patients for whom medical use of marijuana is recommended deserve the same minimum level of care as those prescribed any medication to treat a debilitating condition,” said Andre Ourso, manager of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program at the OHA Public Health Division.
The work group consisted of 10 allopathic and osteopathic physicians and a patient advocate, as well as Ourso and state health officer Katrina Hedberg, MD, as ex-officio members.
Patient evaluation includes obtaining a comprehensive medical history, and performing a complete physical examination appropriate to the patient’s debilitating medical condition and medical history, the report states. The physician should develop a written treatment plan, including documentation of informed consent, and discuss risks and benefits. The physician should follow up with the treatment plan, conduct ongoing evaluation and treatment, and properly maintain and document health records.
The report also notes that the work group “strongly opposes the smoking of marijuana as a means of therapeutic delivery” because of harms associated with inhaling any kind of smoke, and that several other delivery options are available that pose less risk to patient health.
“Marijuana smoke, like smoke from a cigarette or a wood-burning stove, contains particulate matter, much of which is potentially bad for the lungs, so we do not recommend a patient consume marijuana by smoking it,” Hedberg said.
In addition, physicians should advise patients to consume the lowest possible amount of marijuana to achieve discussed treatment goals, according to the guidelines. They also recommend physicians consider the potential negative health effects of using marijuana while also using opioids, and it refers physicians to Oregon’s Opioid Prescribing Guidelines.
The report is available at http://healthoregon.org/marijuana under “Publications.”

Sounds expensive. A lot of unnecessary medical bureaucracy.

I'm glad it's sold over the counter now and you don't need a prescription.

With so many people growing now. the more regs they impose and drive the price up the more people will just but from the man on the street.
LOL when I say" the man on the street" I mean their neighbor or friend of a friend.


The Oregon recreational marijuana measure 91 says you can grow four plants but only possess 8 ounces at home.

Does anyone actually think people grow their FOUR plants and only keep 8 ozs?
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#13
(02-16-2017, 01:04 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(02-15-2017, 09:15 PM)chuck white Wrote:
(02-15-2017, 10:15 AM)Valuesize Wrote: PORTLAND, Ore.—Physicians should provide medical marijuana patients a level of care that, at minimum, includes a full evaluation, treatment and follow-up plan, with documentation in the patient’s medical record, when recommending the drug’s use, according to a new Oregon Health Authority report.
A report presented this month to the Oregon Legislature, HB 4014 Clinical Guidelines Work Group: Guidelines for Attending Physicians When Recommending the Medical Use of Marijuana, provides recommendations to physicians on appropriate care of a patient diagnosed with one or more debilitating conditions for which the physician is recommending the medical use of marijuana.
Qualifying debilitating conditions include cancer; glaucoma; a degenerative or pervasive neurological condition; positive HIV or AIDS status; or a side effect related to treating these conditions. Also qualifying are a medical condition or treatment for a condition that produces cachexia; severe pain; severe nausea; seizures; persistent muscle spasms; or post-traumatic stress disorder.
The Clinical Guidelines Work Group, created when the Legislature passed House Bill 4014 in 2016, developed the guidelines with the principals that physicians who recommend medical marijuana to a patient engage in the practice of medicine and do so within the context of a bona-fide physician-patient relationship.
“What this report is saying is that patients for whom medical use of marijuana is recommended deserve the same minimum level of care as those prescribed any medication to treat a debilitating condition,” said Andre Ourso, manager of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program at the OHA Public Health Division.
The work group consisted of 10 allopathic and osteopathic physicians and a patient advocate, as well as Ourso and state health officer Katrina Hedberg, MD, as ex-officio members.
Patient evaluation includes obtaining a comprehensive medical history, and performing a complete physical examination appropriate to the patient’s debilitating medical condition and medical history, the report states. The physician should develop a written treatment plan, including documentation of informed consent, and discuss risks and benefits. The physician should follow up with the treatment plan, conduct ongoing evaluation and treatment, and properly maintain and document health records.
The report also notes that the work group “strongly opposes the smoking of marijuana as a means of therapeutic delivery” because of harms associated with inhaling any kind of smoke, and that several other delivery options are available that pose less risk to patient health.
“Marijuana smoke, like smoke from a cigarette or a wood-burning stove, contains particulate matter, much of which is potentially bad for the lungs, so we do not recommend a patient consume marijuana by smoking it,” Hedberg said.
In addition, physicians should advise patients to consume the lowest possible amount of marijuana to achieve discussed treatment goals, according to the guidelines. They also recommend physicians consider the potential negative health effects of using marijuana while also using opioids, and it refers physicians to Oregon’s Opioid Prescribing Guidelines.
The report is available at http://healthoregon.org/marijuana under “Publications.”

Sounds expensive. A lot of unnecessary medical bureaucracy.

I'm glad it's sold over the counter now and you don't need a prescription.

With so many people growing now. the more regs they impose and drive the price up the more people will just but from the man on the street.
LOL when I say" the man on the street" I mean their neighbor or friend of a friend.


The Oregon recreational marijuana measure 91 says you can grow four plants but only possess 8 ounces at home.

Does anyone actually think people grow their FOUR plants and only keep 8 ozs?

Hell 8 Oz, wouldn't last to the next harvest.
But I keep my stash under 8 Oz and my two dogs each keep their stash under 8 oz.
(good thing my dogs share with me) Laughing
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