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Random question - Tiamat - 08-12-2011

What happens if a Sherriff serves a supoena to the wrong person??BlinkUnsure:wacko:


RE: Random question - hillclimber - 08-12-2011

(08-12-2011, 05:10 PM)Tiamat Wrote: What happens if a Sherriff serves a supoena to the wrong person??BlinkUnsure:wacko:

That person may be in trouble.. The Sheriff (deputy or server) must deliver the subpoena to the right person.. If someone takes the subpoena under false pretense, he may have to answer for it.
I think that's correct, but there may be circumstances I don't know.



RE: Random question - Wonky - 08-12-2011

(08-12-2011, 05:10 PM)Tiamat Wrote: What happens if a Sherriff serves a supoena to the wrong person??BlinkUnsure:wacko:

It's my understanding (having been on the receiving end of a couple of subpoenas) that if one identifies himself/herself as the person the server asked to see, no further identification is required. I was once touched by a server and when I objected he told me it was required. That I don't know to be true.




RE: Random question - PonderThis - 08-12-2011

There's some circumstances where "serving" can be accomplished by posting the paperwork on your door, and mailing you a copy also. I think we're going to need some more details here.

I've had papers served where I specifically had the sheriff serve them, because I knew that would hold up in court best. You may need some real legal advice here.


RE: Random question - Tiamat - 08-12-2011

(08-12-2011, 05:39 PM)Wonky Wrote:
(08-12-2011, 05:10 PM)Tiamat Wrote: What happens if a Sherriff serves a supoena to the wrong person??BlinkUnsure:wacko:

It's my understanding (having been on the receiving end of a couple of subpoenas) that if one identifies himself/herself as the person the server asked to see, no further identification is required. I was once touched by a server and when I objected he told me it was required. That I don't know to be true.

What if you identify yourself (verbally) as NOT the person and the sherriff says it's whoever it should be and serves you anyway? I'm laughing, because this just happened today.


RE: Random question - Wonky - 08-12-2011

(08-12-2011, 05:42 PM)PonderThis Wrote: There's some circumstances where "serving" can be accomplished by posting the paperwork on your door, and mailing you a copy also. I think we're going to need some more details here.

I've had papers served where I specifically had the sheriff serve them, because I knew that would hold up in court best. You may need some real legal advice here.

And THAT's good advice.




RE: Random question - Tiamat - 08-12-2011

Well, it's going to an attorney to figure out, but, it's not me, nor my attorney, so I just am fascinated. Not looking for advice here, Wonk, just info, if anyone has it.


RE: Random question - Valuesize - 08-12-2011

Was it A sheriff or THE Sheriff? I would call a superior. Big Grin


RE: Random question - PonderThis - 08-12-2011

I don't know if this provides anything interesting, but it's from Tel Law, free legal information from the Oregon State Bar online: http://www.osbar.org/public/legalinfo/1062_Subpoena.htm

"What Is a Subpoena?

It is important to realize that changes may occur in this area of law. This information is not intended to be legal advice regarding your particular problem, and it is not intended to replace the work of an attorney.


If you have received a legal document called a subpoena from a process server, it is important that you know what this paper is and what it means to you. A subpoena is an order issued by the court requiring you to appear in person at a certain place, date and time to testify as a witness about a particular case. In a criminal case, you can be subpoenaed only to testify in court. In a civil case, you may be subpoenaed for out-of-court testimony as well. In either kind of case, a subpoena may require you to provide documents.

Subpoenas may be delivered in person by a deputy sheriff or by any other person at least 18 years old who is not a party to the lawsuit and is not an employee of, or attorney for, any party to the case.

If you are not one of the parties in the case, you should receive an attendance fee and transportation costs (based on mileage) for appearing at the designated time and place. In a civil case, the person serving the subpoena should give you cash or a check for the attendance fee and transportation costs when he or she serves you with the subpoena. In a criminal case, you will be paid your witness fee and mileage costs after you travel to the designated place and testify as a witness.

Read the subpoena carefully. The subpoena will tell you: the names of the parties; the date, time and place you will need to appear; the name of the lawyer who issued the subpoena; and the location and type of court in which the lawsuit is taking place.

If the subpoena requires you to bring certain documents or other objects, they should be described in the subpoena or in a separate paper given to you along with the subpoena.

You may object in writing to any subpoena, listing all the reasons you think it is unfair or unjust for you to appear or to produce such documents or objects. Objections should be filed with the court immediately, not on the date you are required to appear or provide the documents. You may want to consult with a lawyer to make sure that your objections are filed correctly and on time.

A subpoena will also require that you remain at the place described until the testimony is closed, unless the judge excuses you. However, at the end of each day, you should contact the lawyer for the party who subpoenaed you to find out if you may be called the next day, or sometime in the future. This may help to prevent confusion or unnecessary time spent waiting.

If you do not appear as the subpoena orders, you may be found in contempt of court. Contempt of court may result in a jail term. The court may also require you to pay compensation fees to the parties who may have been damaged by your failure to appear. The court may also issue a warrant for your arrest and ask the sheriff to take you into custody and bring you to the place at which your testimony is required.
If it is impossible or extremely difficult for you to appear at the time required by the subpoena, call the lawyer for the party who issued the subpoena. Usually, the lawyer’s name, address and phone number will appear on the subpoena. He or she might be able to postpone your testimony so you could testify at another time. You should keep in mind, however, that the lawyer may not be able to change the date and time of your requested appearance if a court date is already established and cannot be moved. If it is absolutely impossible for you to appear, or if it would be seriously harmful to your health or business, you should seek the advice of your own lawyer to decide if there may be legal grounds for you to be excused."


RE: Random question - Tiamat - 08-12-2011

(08-12-2011, 06:26 PM)Valuesize Wrote: Was it A sheriff or THE Sheriff? I would call a superior. Big Grin

A sherriff. But, now that I think about it, I think the subpoena is served regardless, because it was the right address. Legal advice is being sought. I am amused. I am a closet anarchist. Where's CometMom?


RE: Random question - tvguy - 08-12-2011

Quote:Wonky..I was once touched by a server and when I objected he told me it was required. That I don't know to be true.



Yes I was there with Wonky. The poor guy was just trying to refill his coffee.


RE: Random question - tvguy - 08-12-2011

(08-12-2011, 07:18 PM)Tiamat Wrote:
(08-12-2011, 06:26 PM)Valuesize Wrote: Was it A sheriff or THE Sheriff? I would call a superior. Big Grin

A sherriff. But, now that I think about it, I think the subpoena is served regardless, because it was the right address. Legal advice is being sought. I am amused. I am a closet anarchist. Where's CometMom?

I think the word that's missing is a "deputy" Tia what is the issue? Can't you just give this subpoena to who it was intended or tell the sheriff you aint him or whatever?

Legal advice over this? what's the point? Why do they climb mountains?


RE: Random question - Tiamat - 08-12-2011

Uh, TV, it's just a question. I would think that it might be an issue. To someone. What's Deputy got do with it? It's still the Sherriff.


RE: Random question - tvguy - 08-12-2011

(08-12-2011, 07:55 PM)Tiamat Wrote: Uh, TV, it's just a question. I would think that it might be an issue. To someone. What's Deputy got do with it? It's still the Sherriff.

You were asked Was it A sheriff or THE Sheriff? and you said a sheriff

I believe that there is only one Sheriff and all the rest are the sheriff deputies and a deputy probably served the subpoena..

I know it's just a question.I just wondered why this was or could be an issue.


RE: Random question - PonderThis - 08-12-2011

The real sheriff has better things to do than drive around issuing subpoenas. In Douglas county they have one deputy that does nothing but deliver civil paperwork, and it keeps him busy at least a couple days a week.


RE: Random question - Tiamat - 08-12-2011

(08-12-2011, 08:12 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(08-12-2011, 07:55 PM)Tiamat Wrote: Uh, TV, it's just a question. I would think that it might be an issue. To someone. What's Deputy got do with it? It's still the Sherriff.

You were asked Was it A sheriff or THE Sheriff? and you said a sheriff

I believe that there is only one Sheriff and all the rest are the sheriff deputies and a deputy probably served the subpoena..

I know it's just a question.I just wondered why this was or could be an issue.

LOLLaughing Well don't ask me!!


Look, I'm a closet anarchist. I hate all things to do with legal interrogation, search, seizure, yada yada...just wondering.


RE: Random question - Tiamat - 08-12-2011

(08-12-2011, 08:25 PM)PonderThis Wrote: The real sheriff has better things to do than drive around issuing subpoenas. In Douglas county they have one deputy that does nothing but deliver civil paperwork, and it keeps him busy at least a couple days a week.

Wondering why you bothered to ask then.


RE: Random question - tvguy - 08-12-2011

(08-12-2011, 08:25 PM)PonderThis Wrote: The real sheriff has better things to do than drive around issuing subpoenas. In Douglas county they have one deputy that does nothing but deliver civil paperwork, and it keeps him busy at least a couple days a week.

Yeah Here In Jackson county our real sheriff is busy trying to keep concealed weapons permits from pot smokers.


RE: Random question - PonderThis - 08-12-2011

(08-12-2011, 08:34 PM)Tiamat Wrote:
(08-12-2011, 08:25 PM)PonderThis Wrote: The real sheriff has better things to do than drive around issuing subpoenas. In Douglas county they have one deputy that does nothing but deliver civil paperwork, and it keeps him busy at least a couple days a week.

Wondering why you bothered to ask then.

Why I asked?


RE: Random question - chuck white - 08-12-2011

Just show up to court with the paper in hand.