Guns Guns Guns and more Guns... Everything that's Guns!
(05-26-2018, 12:18 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(05-26-2018, 11:26 AM)Cuzz Wrote: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-india...SKCN1IQ1Z7

That makes more then one school shooting each week for this year, so far.

Yes but unless I'm wrong what ever you saw that said that counts any gun that goes off on a school property as a "school shooting" Even if no one was shot.
Some crack head shoots another crackhead at 1:00 am in some inner city school yard and its a "school shooting"

 They even count when a gun was fired and no one was hit, plus suicides.

I understand your point but I'm not sure it matters much. Guns going off in the schoolyard isn't such a good thing. I was just pointing out how often it's been happening. I thought it was a little surprising.
Reply
(05-26-2018, 03:00 PM)Cuzz Wrote:
(05-26-2018, 12:18 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(05-26-2018, 11:26 AM)Cuzz Wrote: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-india...SKCN1IQ1Z7

That makes more then one school shooting each week for this year, so far.

Yes but unless I'm wrong what ever you saw that said that counts any gun that goes off on a school property as a "school shooting" Even if no one was shot.
Some crack head shoots another crackhead at 1:00 am in some inner city school yard and its a "school shooting"

 They even count when a gun was fired and no one was hit, plus suicides.

I understand your point but I'm not sure it matters much. Guns going off in the schoolyard isn't such a good thing. I was just pointing out how often it's been happening. I thought it was a little surprising.

Well considering how many schools there are,, like bazillions there's bound to be a significant amount of guns being fired for one reason or the other.

In my opinion the statement that there is one school shooting each week for this year Is dishonestly deceptive.
|
People read that kind of fact and you know as well as I do they don't know a "school shooting" is defined by any time a gun ever goes off for any reason.

At this time people assume it means a nut with a gun shooting kids. In the end result it makes people think the by the numbers school shooting problem is bigger than it really is.
And when that happens more and more people think we need to ban guns or certain types of guns. based on info that at best deceptive and IMO close to a LIE.
Reply
(04-27-2018, 09:29 PM)chuck white Wrote:
Quote:APRIL 27--A Missouri woman who had a loaded handgun hidden in her vagina at the time of her arrest last year today pleaded guilty to weapons possession and narcotics charges.
[Image: anikawitt18x.jpg]
.

http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documents/c...ase-482903

UPDATE:


Quote:A woman who had a loaded handgun hidden in her vagina at the time of her arrest last year has been sentenced to two years in state prison on weapons and heroin possession charges, Illinois court records show.
http://thesmokinggun.com/documents/crime...ced-902843
Reply
And talk about a bad aim.

Quote:COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Police say a 67-year-old Colorado man attempting to shoot a raccoon on a utility pole shot himself in the lower leg instead.


https://www.reddit.com/r/NewsOfTheStupid...s_himself/
Reply
I was on a different forum and this post was made. It said it was from "gunpowder magazine" and was part of the culture war on guns.

Quote:Have you had the experience of going to your doctor for a particular problem, let’s say headaches, and been surprised by the doctor asking you about a completely unrelated subject — whether you have a gun in your home?


It’s no accident that doctors’ or health plans’ questions about guns in your home have become routine. In the 1980s and 1990s medical professional organizations declared a culture war on gun ownership in America. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) developed an official policy urging pediatricians to probe their young patients’ parents about guns in their homes.


Claiming only to be concerned about “gun safety”, the latest code term for gun control, the AAP pushed its member doctors to advise families to get rid of their guns. One of the authors of the original AAP anti-gun policy, Dr. Katherine Christoffel, was quoted in an AMA journal as saying “Guns are a virus that must be eradicated.”

Sounds kind a BS to  me, but in general, I am adverse to giving too much personal information to anyone who is seeking it, including doctors unless it is necessary.  I don't feel that everything I do, including how many drinks I may have in a week or whether or not I smoke MJ needs to be shared.
Reply
(07-10-2019, 10:19 PM)Juniper Wrote: I was on a different forum and this post was made. It said it was from "gunpowder magazine" and was part of the culture war on guns.

Quote:Have you had the experience of going to your doctor for a particular problem, let’s say headaches, and been surprised by the doctor asking you about a completely unrelated subject — whether you have a gun in your home?


It’s no accident that doctors’ or health plans’ questions about guns in your home have become routine. In the 1980s and 1990s medical professional organizations declared a culture war on gun ownership in America. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) developed an official policy urging pediatricians to probe their young patients’ parents about guns in their homes.


Claiming only to be concerned about “gun safety”, the latest code term for gun control, the AAP pushed its member doctors to advise families to get rid of their guns. One of the authors of the original AAP anti-gun policy, Dr. Katherine Christoffel, was quoted in an AMA journal as saying “Guns are a virus that must be eradicated.”

Sounds kind a BS to  me, but in general, I am adverse to giving too much personal information to anyone who is seeking it, including doctors unless it is necessary.  I don't feel that everything I do, including how many drinks I may have in a week or whether or not I smoke MJ needs to be shared.

I'm with you on that. When asked about things not related to my reason to see the doctor my answers are generally ambiguous at best.

As for the article I'd say BS too. In the '80's and '90's no mention was ever made that I remember.
Reply
(07-10-2019, 10:19 PM)Juniper Wrote: I was on a different forum and this post was made. It said it was from "gunpowder magazine" and was part of the culture war on guns.

Quote:Have you had the experience of going to your doctor for a particular problem, let’s say headaches, and been surprised by the doctor asking you about a completely unrelated subject — whether you have a gun in your home?


It’s no accident that doctors’ or health plans’ questions about guns in your home have become routine. In the 1980s and 1990s medical professional organizations declared a culture war on gun ownership in America. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) developed an official policy urging pediatricians to probe their young patients’ parents about guns in their homes.


Claiming only to be concerned about “gun safety”, the latest code term for gun control, the AAP pushed its member doctors to advise families to get rid of their guns. One of the authors of the original AAP anti-gun policy, Dr. Katherine Christoffel, was quoted in an AMA journal as saying “Guns are a virus that must be eradicated.”

Sounds kind a BS to  me, but in general, I am adverse to giving too much personal information to anyone who is seeking it, including doctors unless it is necessary.  I don't feel that everything I do, including how many drinks I may have in a week or whether or not I smoke MJ needs to be shared.

It's possible there is some truth to it. I wonder how many pediatricians have asked families to get rid of their swimming pools? More children drown than are killed by guns.
And a swimming pool will never protect a family from harm where as a gun possibly will.
Reply
(07-11-2019, 02:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(07-10-2019, 10:19 PM)Juniper Wrote: I was on a different forum and this post was made. It said it was from "gunpowder magazine" and was part of the culture war on guns.

Quote:Have you had the experience of going to your doctor for a particular problem, let’s say headaches, and been surprised by the doctor asking you about a completely unrelated subject — whether you have a gun in your home?


It’s no accident that doctors’ or health plans’ questions about guns in your home have become routine. In the 1980s and 1990s medical professional organizations declared a culture war on gun ownership in America. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) developed an official policy urging pediatricians to probe their young patients’ parents about guns in their homes.


Claiming only to be concerned about “gun safety”, the latest code term for gun control, the AAP pushed its member doctors to advise families to get rid of their guns. One of the authors of the original AAP anti-gun policy, Dr. Katherine Christoffel, was quoted in an AMA journal as saying “Guns are a virus that must be eradicated.”

Sounds kind a BS to  me, but in general, I am adverse to giving too much personal information to anyone who is seeking it, including doctors unless it is necessary.  I don't feel that everything I do, including how many drinks I may have in a week or whether or not I smoke MJ needs to be shared.

It's possible there is some truth to it. I wonder how many pediatricians have asked families to get rid of their swimming pools? More children drown than are killed by guns.
And a swimming pool will never protect a family from harm where as a gun possibly will.

I agree there may be some truth in their information gathering, because they do it with everything now, whether or not it's a plot against the second amendment, I wonder.
Reply
(07-11-2019, 04:00 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 02:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(07-10-2019, 10:19 PM)Juniper Wrote: I was on a different forum and this post was made. It said it was from "gunpowder magazine" and was part of the culture war on guns.

Quote:Have you had the experience of going to your doctor for a particular problem, let’s say headaches, and been surprised by the doctor asking you about a completely unrelated subject — whether you have a gun in your home?


It’s no accident that doctors’ or health plans’ questions about guns in your home have become routine. In the 1980s and 1990s medical professional organizations declared a culture war on gun ownership in America. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) developed an official policy urging pediatricians to probe their young patients’ parents about guns in their homes.


Claiming only to be concerned about “gun safety”, the latest code term for gun control, the AAP pushed its member doctors to advise families to get rid of their guns. One of the authors of the original AAP anti-gun policy, Dr. Katherine Christoffel, was quoted in an AMA journal as saying “Guns are a virus that must be eradicated.”

Sounds kind a BS to  me, but in general, I am adverse to giving too much personal information to anyone who is seeking it, including doctors unless it is necessary.  I don't feel that everything I do, including how many drinks I may have in a week or whether or not I smoke MJ needs to be shared.

It's possible there is some truth to it. I wonder how many pediatricians have asked families to get rid of their swimming pools? More children drown than are killed by guns.
And a swimming pool will never protect a family from harm where as a gun possibly will.

I agree there may be some truth in their information gathering, because they do it with everything now, whether or not it's a plot against the second amendment, I wonder.

Liars can figure and figures can lie. The most common statistic anti gun people like to use is the one that says if you have a gun in the house it's more likely to be used on you or someone in your house than a criminal.

But that stat doesn't state all the variables. Like the fact that many are suicides by the young or the elderly.
Well no one is young where I live and I'm the only elderly one. So if I don't care about those stats.
Also is that true for those who have been using firearms their entire life? And surely that statistic will include drug dealers and criminals.
Reply
(07-11-2019, 02:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(07-10-2019, 10:19 PM)Juniper Wrote: I was on a different forum and this post was made. It said it was from "gunpowder magazine" and was part of the culture war on guns.

Quote:Have you had the experience of going to your doctor for a particular problem, let’s say headaches, and been surprised by the doctor asking you about a completely unrelated subject — whether you have a gun in your home?


It’s no accident that doctors’ or health plans’ questions about guns in your home have become routine. In the 1980s and 1990s medical professional organizations declared a culture war on gun ownership in America. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) developed an official policy urging pediatricians to probe their young patients’ parents about guns in their homes.


Claiming only to be concerned about “gun safety”, the latest code term for gun control, the AAP pushed its member doctors to advise families to get rid of their guns. One of the authors of the original AAP anti-gun policy, Dr. Katherine Christoffel, was quoted in an AMA journal as saying “Guns are a virus that must be eradicated.”

Sounds kind a BS to  me, but in general, I am adverse to giving too much personal information to anyone who is seeking it, including doctors unless it is necessary.  I don't feel that everything I do, including how many drinks I may have in a week or whether or not I smoke MJ needs to be shared.

It's possible there is some truth to it. I wonder how many pediatricians have asked families to get rid of their swimming pools? More children drown than are killed by guns.
And a swimming pool will never protect a family from harm where as a gun possibly will.

Shit... we raised three kids (and half the neighborhood kids) with a pool and lots of guns at our house. No one died.
Reply
(07-11-2019, 06:33 PM)Scrapper Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 02:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(07-10-2019, 10:19 PM)Juniper Wrote: I was on a different forum and this post was made. It said it was from "gunpowder magazine" and was part of the culture war on guns.

Quote:Have you had the experience of going to your doctor for a particular problem, let’s say headaches, and been surprised by the doctor asking you about a completely unrelated subject — whether you have a gun in your home?


It’s no accident that doctors’ or health plans’ questions about guns in your home have become routine. In the 1980s and 1990s medical professional organizations declared a culture war on gun ownership in America. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) developed an official policy urging pediatricians to probe their young patients’ parents about guns in their homes.


Claiming only to be concerned about “gun safety”, the latest code term for gun control, the AAP pushed its member doctors to advise families to get rid of their guns. One of the authors of the original AAP anti-gun policy, Dr. Katherine Christoffel, was quoted in an AMA journal as saying “Guns are a virus that must be eradicated.”

Sounds kind a BS to  me, but in general, I am adverse to giving too much personal information to anyone who is seeking it, including doctors unless it is necessary.  I don't feel that everything I do, including how many drinks I may have in a week or whether or not I smoke MJ needs to be shared.

It's possible there is some truth to it. I wonder how many pediatricians have asked families to get rid of their swimming pools? More children drown than are killed by guns.
And a swimming pool will never protect a family from harm where as a gun possibly will.

Shit... we raised three kids (and half the neighborhood kids) with a pool and lots of guns at our house. No one died.

I just don't like the data collecting. Because everything is so connected now...it shows up years later.  I can't think of a specific example but I know it's happened to me before, so now, no matter what the question is, I usually just give the one I think is the most "appropriate" one. The one they want to hear.
Reply
(07-11-2019, 06:33 PM)Scrapper Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 02:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(07-10-2019, 10:19 PM)Juniper Wrote: I was on a different forum and this post was made. It said it was from "gunpowder magazine" and was part of the culture war on guns.

Quote:Have you had the experience of going to your doctor for a particular problem, let’s say headaches, and been surprised by the doctor asking you about a completely unrelated subject — whether you have a gun in your home?


It’s no accident that doctors’ or health plans’ questions about guns in your home have become routine. In the 1980s and 1990s medical professional organizations declared a culture war on gun ownership in America. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) developed an official policy urging pediatricians to probe their young patients’ parents about guns in their homes.


Claiming only to be concerned about “gun safety”, the latest code term for gun control, the AAP pushed its member doctors to advise families to get rid of their guns. One of the authors of the original AAP anti-gun policy, Dr. Katherine Christoffel, was quoted in an AMA journal as saying “Guns are a virus that must be eradicated.”

Sounds kind a BS to  me, but in general, I am adverse to giving too much personal information to anyone who is seeking it, including doctors unless it is necessary.  I don't feel that everything I do, including how many drinks I may have in a week or whether or not I smoke MJ needs to be shared.

It's possible there is some truth to it. I wonder how many pediatricians have asked families to get rid of their swimming pools? More children drown than are killed by guns.
And a swimming pool will never protect a family from harm where as a gun possibly will.

Shit... we raised three kids (and half the neighborhood kids) with a pool and lots of guns at our house. No one died.

I just don't like the data collecting. Because everything is so connected now...it shows up years later.  I can't think of a specific example but I know it's happened to me before, so now, no matter what the question is, I usually just give the one I think is the most "appropriate" one. The one they want to hear.
Reply
(07-11-2019, 09:09 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 06:33 PM)Scrapper Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 02:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(07-10-2019, 10:19 PM)Juniper Wrote: I was on a different forum and this post was made. It said it was from "gunpowder magazine" and was part of the culture war on guns.

Quote:Have you had the experience of going to your doctor for a particular problem, let’s say headaches, and been surprised by the doctor asking you about a completely unrelated subject — whether you have a gun in your home?


It’s no accident that doctors’ or health plans’ questions about guns in your home have become routine. In the 1980s and 1990s medical professional organizations declared a culture war on gun ownership in America. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) developed an official policy urging pediatricians to probe their young patients’ parents about guns in their homes.


Claiming only to be concerned about “gun safety”, the latest code term for gun control, the AAP pushed its member doctors to advise families to get rid of their guns. One of the authors of the original AAP anti-gun policy, Dr. Katherine Christoffel, was quoted in an AMA journal as saying “Guns are a virus that must be eradicated.”

Sounds kind a BS to  me, but in general, I am adverse to giving too much personal information to anyone who is seeking it, including doctors unless it is necessary.  I don't feel that everything I do, including how many drinks I may have in a week or whether or not I smoke MJ needs to be shared.

It's possible there is some truth to it. I wonder how many pediatricians have asked families to get rid of their swimming pools? More children drown than are killed by guns.
And a swimming pool will never protect a family from harm where as a gun possibly will.

Shit... we raised three kids (and half the neighborhood kids) with a pool and lots of guns at our house. No one died.

I just don't like the data collecting. Because everything is so connected now...it shows up years later.  I can't think of a specific example but I know it's happened to me before, so now, no matter what the question is, I usually just give the one I think is the most "appropriate" one. The one they want to hear.

Who is asking you?
Reply
(07-11-2019, 09:38 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 06:33 PM)Scrapper Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 02:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(07-10-2019, 10:19 PM)Juniper Wrote: I was on a different forum and this post was made. It said it was from "gunpowder magazine" and was part of the culture war on guns.

Quote:Have you had the experience of going to your doctor for a particular problem, let’s say headaches, and been surprised by the doctor asking you about a completely unrelated subject — whether you have a gun in your home?


It’s no accident that doctors’ or health plans’ questions about guns in your home have become routine. In the 1980s and 1990s medical professional organizations declared a culture war on gun ownership in America. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) developed an official policy urging pediatricians to probe their young patients’ parents about guns in their homes.


Claiming only to be concerned about “gun safety”, the latest code term for gun control, the AAP pushed its member doctors to advise families to get rid of their guns. One of the authors of the original AAP anti-gun policy, Dr. Katherine Christoffel, was quoted in an AMA journal as saying “Guns are a virus that must be eradicated.”

Sounds kind a BS to  me, but in general, I am adverse to giving too much personal information to anyone who is seeking it, including doctors unless it is necessary.  I don't feel that everything I do, including how many drinks I may have in a week or whether or not I smoke MJ needs to be shared.

It's possible there is some truth to it. I wonder how many pediatricians have asked families to get rid of their swimming pools? More children drown than are killed by guns.
And a swimming pool will never protect a family from harm where as a gun possibly will.

Shit... we raised three kids (and half the neighborhood kids) with a pool and lots of guns at our house. No one died.

I just don't like the data collecting. Because everything is so connected now...it shows up years later.  I can't think of a specific example but I know it's happened to me before, so now, no matter what the question is, I usually just give the one I think is the most "appropriate" one. The one they want to hear.

Who is asking? Laughing Laughing Laughing
Reply
(07-11-2019, 09:43 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 09:38 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 06:33 PM)Scrapper Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 02:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(07-10-2019, 10:19 PM)Juniper Wrote: I was on a different forum and this post was made. It said it was from "gunpowder magazine" and was part of the culture war on guns.


Sounds kind a BS to  me, but in general, I am adverse to giving too much personal information to anyone who is seeking it, including doctors unless it is necessary.  I don't feel that everything I do, including how many drinks I may have in a week or whether or not I smoke MJ needs to be shared.

It's possible there is some truth to it. I wonder how many pediatricians have asked families to get rid of their swimming pools? More children drown than are killed by guns.
And a swimming pool will never protect a family from harm where as a gun possibly will.

Shit... we raised three kids (and half the neighborhood kids) with a pool and lots of guns at our house. No one died.

I just don't like the data collecting. Because everything is so connected now...it shows up years later.  I can't think of a specific example but I know it's happened to me before, so now, no matter what the question is, I usually just give the one I think is the most "appropriate" one. The one they want to hear.

Who is asking? Laughing Laughing Laughing

Oh, doctors, insurance, employers, people who don't need to know. FB is a little dicey like that.  I have to be careful. I pull a lot of punches because I know my employers are often on the same pages I am.
Reply
(07-11-2019, 09:54 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 09:43 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 09:38 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 06:33 PM)Scrapper Wrote:
(07-11-2019, 02:40 PM)tvguy Wrote: It's possible there is some truth to it. I wonder how many pediatricians have asked families to get rid of their swimming pools? More children drown than are killed by guns.
And a swimming pool will never protect a family from harm where as a gun possibly will.

Shit... we raised three kids (and half the neighborhood kids) with a pool and lots of guns at our house. No one died.

I just don't like the data collecting. Because everything is so connected now...it shows up years later.  I can't think of a specific example but I know it's happened to me before, so now, no matter what the question is, I usually just give the one I think is the most "appropriate" one. The one they want to hear.

Who is asking? Laughing Laughing Laughing

Oh, doctors, insurance, employers, people who don't need to know. FB is a little dicey like that.  I have to be careful. I pull a lot of punches because I know my employers are often on the same pages I am.

Yeah I pull a lot of punches too.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)