Watched on Netflix (or other streaming channels)
(01-05-2019, 03:03 PM)tvguy Wrote: Hey Juniper. I was thinking how funny it would be if your daughter was on Wheel of fortune and it said this....


WOOD_ _ _ _ _ FESTIVAL

OK Pat, I'll take an R please.


Laughing Laughing Laughing

She wouldn't have a CLUE!!
Reply
(01-05-2019, 03:21 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:03 PM)tvguy Wrote: Hey Juniper. I was thinking how funny it would be if your daughter was on Wheel of fortune and it said this....


WOOD_ _ _ _ _ FESTIVAL

OK Pat, I'll take an R please.


Laughing Laughing Laughing

She wouldn't have a CLUE!!
And she would NEVER live it down Laughing Laughing






[Image: puzzle.php?bg=1&ln1=%20Wood_____&ln2=Festi...%20festival&]
Reply
(01-05-2019, 03:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:21 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:03 PM)tvguy Wrote: Hey Juniper. I was thinking how funny it would be if your daughter was on Wheel of fortune and it said this....


WOOD_ _ _ _ _ FESTIVAL

OK Pat, I'll take an R please.


Laughing Laughing Laughing

She wouldn't have a CLUE!!
And she would NEVER live it down Laughing Laughing






[Image: puzzle.php?bg=1&ln1=%20Wood_____&ln2=Festi...%20festival&]

I didn't even bother explaining it to her when she didn't know what it was. I just looked at her in disbelief.
Reply
(01-05-2019, 03:43 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:21 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:03 PM)tvguy Wrote: Hey Juniper. I was thinking how funny it would be if your daughter was on Wheel of fortune and it said this....


WOOD_ _ _ _ _ FESTIVAL

OK Pat, I'll take an R please.


Laughing Laughing Laughing

She wouldn't have a CLUE!!
And she would NEVER live it down Laughing Laughing






[Image: puzzle.php?bg=1&ln1=%20Wood_____&ln2=Festi...%20festival&]

I didn't even bother explaining it to her when she didn't know what it was. I just looked at her in disbelief.

Play this and ask is she has ever heard it.




Reply
(01-05-2019, 03:43 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:21 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:03 PM)tvguy Wrote: Hey Juniper. I was thinking how funny it would be if your daughter was on Wheel of fortune and it said this....


WOOD_ _ _ _ _ FESTIVAL

OK Pat, I'll take an R please.


Laughing Laughing Laughing

She wouldn't have a CLUE!!
And she would NEVER live it down Laughing Laughing






[Image: puzzle.php?bg=1&ln1=%20Wood_____&ln2=Festi...%20festival&]

I didn't even bother explaining it to her when she didn't know what it was. I just looked at her in disbelief.
I was in the Army so I couldn't go, I went to another giant festival when I was on leave called Goose lake. It was one year after Woodstock. They say 200 thousand attended but I have read and I believe it was a lot more than that






[Image: goose-lake-festival-1970.jpg]

It’s been ignored over the past decades that Michigan had it’s own version of the original Woodstock Music Festival in 1970..

Just one year after Woodstock, Goose Lake  – just east of Jackson – held court from August 7-9 1970 to the likes of Bob Seger, Jethro Tull, Rod Stewart, Ten Years After, Chicago, The Stooges, Joe Walsh, Mitch Ryder and many more.
Even though it was basically a peaceful event, it was seen to by public & state ‘officials’ that there would never be another music festival in Michigan. Ever.
-advertisement-
[Image: placeHolder.png]
Along with Governor William Milliken, Michigan attorney general Frank J. Kelley was one of those instrumental in banning Michigan rock festivals, saying: “I think we have seen the first and last rock concert of that size in Michigan.”
Oh, yeah? Well I was there. It was wonderful.
Even though in the past 20-25 years, there have been seedy incidents occurring at various giant rock concerts around the country, Goose Lake - AND Woodstock - proved that it can be done WITHOUT violence or idiots. Wouldn't it be nice if we could have a decent, large rock festival without a handful of morons ruining it for future shows?
Reply
(01-05-2019, 03:51 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:43 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:21 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:03 PM)tvguy Wrote: Hey Juniper. I was thinking how funny it would be if your daughter was on Wheel of fortune and it said this....


WOOD_ _ _ _ _ FESTIVAL

OK Pat, I'll take an R please.


Laughing Laughing Laughing

She wouldn't have a CLUE!!
And she would NEVER live it down Laughing Laughing






[Image: puzzle.php?bg=1&ln1=%20Wood_____&ln2=Festi...%20festival&]

I didn't even bother explaining it to her when she didn't know what it was. I just looked at her in disbelief.

Play this and ask is she has ever heard it.





You're joking right?  Of course she's HEARD it. She won't know anything about it though. It won't mean anything to her, even she she grew up hearing it.
Reply
(01-05-2019, 04:07 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:43 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:21 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:03 PM)tvguy Wrote: Hey Juniper. I was thinking how funny it would be if your daughter was on Wheel of fortune and it said this....


WOOD_ _ _ _ _ FESTIVAL

OK Pat, I'll take an R please.


Laughing Laughing Laughing

She wouldn't have a CLUE!!
And she would NEVER live it down Laughing Laughing






[Image: puzzle.php?bg=1&ln1=%20Wood_____&ln2=Festi...%20festival&]

I didn't even bother explaining it to her when she didn't know what it was. I just looked at her in disbelief.
I was in the Army so I couldn't go, I went to another giant festival when I was on leave called Goose lake. It was one year after Woodstock. They say 200 thousand attended but I have read and I believe it was a lot more than that






[Image: goose-lake-festival-1970.jpg]

It’s been ignored over the past decades that Michigan had it’s own version of the original Woodstock Music Festival in 1970..

Just one year after Woodstock, Goose Lake  – just east of Jackson – held court from August 7-9 1970 to the likes of Bob Seger, Jethro Tull, Rod Stewart, Ten Years After, Chicago, The Stooges, Joe Walsh, Mitch Ryder and many more.
Even though it was basically a peaceful event, it was seen to by public & state ‘officials’ that there would never be another music festival in Michigan. Ever.
-advertisement-
[Image: placeHolder.png]
Along with Governor William Milliken, Michigan attorney general Frank J. Kelley was one of those instrumental in banning Michigan rock festivals, saying: “I think we have seen the first and last rock concert of that size in Michigan.”
Oh, yeah? Well I was there. It was wonderful.
Even though in the past 20-25 years, there have been seedy incidents occurring at various giant rock concerts around the country, Goose Lake - AND Woodstock - proved that it can be done WITHOUT violence or idiots. Wouldn't it be nice if we could have a decent, large rock festival without a handful of morons ruining it for future shows?

I think Woodstock just made history, that's all. There are plenty of music festivals I haven't heard of.
Reply
(01-05-2019, 07:54 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 04:07 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:43 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:40 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:21 PM)Juniper Wrote: She wouldn't have a CLUE!!
And she would NEVER live it down Laughing Laughing






[Image: puzzle.php?bg=1&ln1=%20Wood_____&ln2=Festi...%20festival&]

I didn't even bother explaining it to her when she didn't know what it was. I just looked at her in disbelief.
I was in the Army so I couldn't go, I went to another giant festival when I was on leave called Goose lake. It was one year after Woodstock. They say 200 thousand attended but I have read and I believe it was a lot more than that






[Image: goose-lake-festival-1970.jpg]

It’s been ignored over the past decades that Michigan had it’s own version of the original Woodstock Music Festival in 1970..

Just one year after Woodstock, Goose Lake  – just east of Jackson – held court from August 7-9 1970 to the likes of Bob Seger, Jethro Tull, Rod Stewart, Ten Years After, Chicago, The Stooges, Joe Walsh, Mitch Ryder and many more.
Even though it was basically a peaceful event, it was seen to by public & state ‘officials’ that there would never be another music festival in Michigan. Ever.
-advertisement-
[Image: placeHolder.png]
Along with Governor William Milliken, Michigan attorney general Frank J. Kelley was one of those instrumental in banning Michigan rock festivals, saying: “I think we have seen the first and last rock concert of that size in Michigan.”
Oh, yeah? Well I was there. It was wonderful.
Even though in the past 20-25 years, there have been seedy incidents occurring at various giant rock concerts around the country, Goose Lake - AND Woodstock - proved that it can be done WITHOUT violence or idiots. Wouldn't it be nice if we could have a decent, large rock festival without a handful of morons ruining it for future shows?

I think Woodstock just made history, that's all. There are plenty of music festivals I haven't heard of.
 This was a very big one like WS. I wonder how many have drawn crowds of 200,000? Plenty? I don't think so. At least not the way it was done in the 70's LOL
Today they have crowds of a million plus but it's nothing like WS the way it's ass super organized.
Reply
(01-05-2019, 08:26 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 07:54 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 04:07 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:43 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:40 PM)tvguy Wrote: And she would NEVER live it down Laughing Laughing






[Image: puzzle.php?bg=1&ln1=%20Wood_____&ln2=Festi...%20festival&]

I didn't even bother explaining it to her when she didn't know what it was. I just looked at her in disbelief.
I was in the Army so I couldn't go, I went to another giant festival when I was on leave called Goose lake. It was one year after Woodstock. They say 200 thousand attended but I have read and I believe it was a lot more than that






[Image: goose-lake-festival-1970.jpg]

It’s been ignored over the past decades that Michigan had it’s own version of the original Woodstock Music Festival in 1970..

Just one year after Woodstock, Goose Lake  – just east of Jackson – held court from August 7-9 1970 to the likes of Bob Seger, Jethro Tull, Rod Stewart, Ten Years After, Chicago, The Stooges, Joe Walsh, Mitch Ryder and many more.
Even though it was basically a peaceful event, it was seen to by public & state ‘officials’ that there would never be another music festival in Michigan. Ever.
-advertisement-
[Image: placeHolder.png]
Along with Governor William Milliken, Michigan attorney general Frank J. Kelley was one of those instrumental in banning Michigan rock festivals, saying: “I think we have seen the first and last rock concert of that size in Michigan.”
Oh, yeah? Well I was there. It was wonderful.
Even though in the past 20-25 years, there have been seedy incidents occurring at various giant rock concerts around the country, Goose Lake - AND Woodstock - proved that it can be done WITHOUT violence or idiots. Wouldn't it be nice if we could have a decent, large rock festival without a handful of morons ruining it for future shows?

I think Woodstock just made history, that's all. There are plenty of music festivals I haven't heard of.
 This was a very big one like WS. I wonder how many have drawn crowds of 200,000? Plenty? I don't think so. At least not the way it was done in the 70's LOL
Today they have crowds of a million plus but it's nothing like WS the way it's ass super organized.

I understand, but no one knew Woodstock would be so big. And the fact that the trippin' crowd was so happy and for the most part it went so well is what made it historical.  There's been many other festivals since Woodstock, some I've heard of and others not so much.  I've never heard of the Goose Lake festival. I think Woodstock has that lightening in a bottle kind of thing about it that makes it so memorable.  It's sheer size alone (when that was not predicted) and it's kind of acid laced, flower powered mystique add to it's legend. Don't take the brown acid. My daughter would have no idea why that would be so funny now.
Reply
Anyone watching this?
[Image: 0789d3ee8fa3e70cc189b633ad7057a6.jpg]

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
Reply
(01-05-2019, 09:35 PM)Scrapper Wrote: Anyone watching this?
[Image: 0789d3ee8fa3e70cc189b633ad7057a6.jpg]

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
I haven't, but I believe it.

I did watch part of a series that was based on a John Grisham book called the innocent man or something. I watched one episode. It was remarkable how like Making of a murderer it was in look and feel.
Reply
(01-05-2019, 08:42 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 08:26 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 07:54 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 04:07 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 03:43 PM)Juniper Wrote: I didn't even bother explaining it to her when she didn't know what it was. I just looked at her in disbelief.
I was in the Army so I couldn't go, I went to another giant festival when I was on leave called Goose lake. It was one year after Woodstock. They say 200 thousand attended but I have read and I believe it was a lot more than that






[Image: goose-lake-festival-1970.jpg]

It’s been ignored over the past decades that Michigan had it’s own version of the original Woodstock Music Festival in 1970..

Just one year after Woodstock, Goose Lake  – just east of Jackson – held court from August 7-9 1970 to the likes of Bob Seger, Jethro Tull, Rod Stewart, Ten Years After, Chicago, The Stooges, Joe Walsh, Mitch Ryder and many more.
Even though it was basically a peaceful event, it was seen to by public & state ‘officials’ that there would never be another music festival in Michigan. Ever.
-advertisement-
[Image: placeHolder.png]
Along with Governor William Milliken, Michigan attorney general Frank J. Kelley was one of those instrumental in banning Michigan rock festivals, saying: “I think we have seen the first and last rock concert of that size in Michigan.”
Oh, yeah? Well I was there. It was wonderful.
Even though in the past 20-25 years, there have been seedy incidents occurring at various giant rock concerts around the country, Goose Lake - AND Woodstock - proved that it can be done WITHOUT violence or idiots. Wouldn't it be nice if we could have a decent, large rock festival without a handful of morons ruining it for future shows?

I think Woodstock just made history, that's all. There are plenty of music festivals I haven't heard of.
 This was a very big one like WS. I wonder how many have drawn crowds of 200,000? Plenty? I don't think so. At least not the way it was done in the 70's LOL
Today they have crowds of a million plus but it's nothing like WS the way it's ass super organized.

I understand, but no one knew Woodstock would be so big. And the fact that the trippin' crowd was so happy and for the most part it went so well is what made it historical.  There's been many other festivals since Woodstock, some I've heard of and others not so much.  I've never heard of the Goose Lake festival. I think Woodstock has that lightening in a bottle kind of thing about it that makes it so memorable.  It's sheer size alone (when that was not predicted) and it's kind of acid laced, flower powered mystique add to it's legend. Don't take the brown acid. My daughter would have no idea why that would be so funny now.
I totally agree on what made Woodstock so famous. On the comment you made >>There are plenty of music festivals
I don't agree. I tried to find concerts that had 200 thousand or more that were similar to Woodstock Or Goose lake.
Other than  a few like I posted All I could find were new concerts like Rod Stewart playing to 3 million in Reo or Beyonce .

 
here is one.....


The forgotten festival that was bigger than Woodstock


[/url][url=https://www.thevintagenews.com/2017/04/27/mistinguett-a-french-singer-and-actress-who-in-1919-insured-her-legs-for-500000-francs/]
Apr 27, 2017 Nikola Simonovski
[Image: tt.jpg]
The iconic festival Woodstock is one of the biggest musical events in history. The festival was held at Bethel, New York from 15-18 August 1969 and was visited by more than 400,000 people.
Prominent names such as Janice Joplin, Jimmy Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival and many others took part in the festival, which wanted to spread a message of peace and love.
The original planned length of the festival was 3 days, but it got extended for one more day. When the organizers of the event Michael Lang, John Roberts, Joel Rosenman, and Artie Kornfeld could not find a suitable venue, they decided to throw the party at a dairy farm owned by Max Yasgur.
The hippie gathering was a total success, and even though a few more events with the same name were held, none ever attained the fame of the original Woodstock.
What many people do not know, is that there was another festival held a few years after the famous event but which has now been forgotten, even though it was bigger than Woodstock.



Isle of Wight Festival 1970
[Image: Screen-Shot-2016-05-11-at-10.15.40-AM.png]Photo courtesy of en.wikipedia.org
The Isle of Wight music festival in 1970 was the last of three music festivals to take place on the island between the years of 1968 and 1970. The success of the first two events likely contributed to the huge turnout of attendees—between 600,000 and 700,000 according to the Guinness World Book of Records—even more than at Woodstock! The line-up of performing artists was around 50 people and included Canadian giants Joni Mitchell and Leonard Cohen, also, Jethro Tull, The Moody Blues, Emerson, Lake & Palmer among many others. The Who played at the festival in both 1969 and 1970—the shows formed part of their Tommy tour with sets focusing on their concept album of the same name. Along with a 35 mm film crew, future Academy Award-winning director Murray Lerner filmed the iconic festival that was later made into a movie called Message of Love: The Isle of Wight Festival: The Movie. A photo essay on the festivals was published by the Guardian and acts as a time capsule that will transport you to a different time and place. Music festivals are still held at the Isle of Wight, but we sincerely doubt that they’re as remarkable as the ones that came before them.

Altamont
[Image: Screen-Shot-2016-05-11-at-10.13.36-AM.png]Photo courtesy of jalopnik.com
On December 6, 1969, the Altamont Speedway Free Festival, a counterculture-era rock concert, featured performances by artists/groups Santana, Jefferson Airplane, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and the Rolling Stones just to name some. The festival is best known for its violence and property damage and was dubbed “rock and roll’s all-time worst day” by Rolling Stone magazine’s staff. Many had hoped it would be Woodstock for the west, but as the festival rolled out it was clear it was nothing like the more peaceful event from Yasgur’s farm. Grace Slick had reportedly said “The vibes were bad. Something was very peculiar, not particularly bad, just real peculiar. It was that kind of hazy, abrasive and unsure day. I had expected the loving vibes of Woodstock but that wasn’t coming at me. This was a whole different thing.”
Reply
(01-06-2019, 02:31 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 08:42 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 08:26 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 07:54 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 04:07 PM)tvguy Wrote: I was in the Army so I couldn't go, I went to another giant festival when I was on leave called Goose lake. It was one year after Woodstock. They say 200 thousand attended but I have read and I believe it was a lot more than that






[Image: goose-lake-festival-1970.jpg]

It’s been ignored over the past decades that Michigan had it’s own version of the original Woodstock Music Festival in 1970..

Just one year after Woodstock, Goose Lake  – just east of Jackson – held court from August 7-9 1970 to the likes of Bob Seger, Jethro Tull, Rod Stewart, Ten Years After, Chicago, The Stooges, Joe Walsh, Mitch Ryder and many more.
Even though it was basically a peaceful event, it was seen to by public & state ‘officials’ that there would never be another music festival in Michigan. Ever.
-advertisement-
[Image: placeHolder.png]
Along with Governor William Milliken, Michigan attorney general Frank J. Kelley was one of those instrumental in banning Michigan rock festivals, saying: “I think we have seen the first and last rock concert of that size in Michigan.”
Oh, yeah? Well I was there. It was wonderful.
Even though in the past 20-25 years, there have been seedy incidents occurring at various giant rock concerts around the country, Goose Lake - AND Woodstock - proved that it can be done WITHOUT violence or idiots. Wouldn't it be nice if we could have a decent, large rock festival without a handful of morons ruining it for future shows?

I think Woodstock just made history, that's all. There are plenty of music festivals I haven't heard of.
 This was a very big one like WS. I wonder how many have drawn crowds of 200,000? Plenty? I don't think so. At least not the way it was done in the 70's LOL
Today they have crowds of a million plus but it's nothing like WS the way it's ass super organized.

I understand, but no one knew Woodstock would be so big. And the fact that the trippin' crowd was so happy and for the most part it went so well is what made it historical.  There's been many other festivals since Woodstock, some I've heard of and others not so much.  I've never heard of the Goose Lake festival. I think Woodstock has that lightening in a bottle kind of thing about it that makes it so memorable.  It's sheer size alone (when that was not predicted) and it's kind of acid laced, flower powered mystique add to it's legend. Don't take the brown acid. My daughter would have no idea why that would be so funny now.
I totally agree on what made Woodstock so famous. On the comment you made >>There are plenty of music festivals
I don't agree. I tried to find concerts that had 200 thousand or more that were similar to Woodstock Or Goose lake.
Other than  a few like I posted All I could find were new concerts like Rod Stewart playing to 3 million in Reo or Beyonce .

 
here is one.....


The forgotten festival that was bigger than Woodstock


[/url][url=https://www.thevintagenews.com/2017/04/27/mistinguett-a-french-singer-and-actress-who-in-1919-insured-her-legs-for-500000-francs/]
Apr 27, 2017 Nikola Simonovski
[Image: tt.jpg]
The iconic festival Woodstock is one of the biggest musical events in history. The festival was held at Bethel, New York from 15-18 August 1969 and was visited by more than 400,000 people.
Prominent names such as Janice Joplin, Jimmy Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival and many others took part in the festival, which wanted to spread a message of peace and love.
The original planned length of the festival was 3 days, but it got extended for one more day. When the organizers of the event Michael Lang, John Roberts, Joel Rosenman, and Artie Kornfeld could not find a suitable venue, they decided to throw the party at a dairy farm owned by Max Yasgur.
The hippie gathering was a total success, and even though a few more events with the same name were held, none ever attained the fame of the original Woodstock.
What many people do not know, is that there was another festival held a few years after the famous event but which has now been forgotten, even though it was bigger than Woodstock.



Isle of Wight Festival 1970
[Image: Screen-Shot-2016-05-11-at-10.15.40-AM.png]Photo courtesy of en.wikipedia.org
The Isle of Wight music festival in 1970 was the last of three music festivals to take place on the island between the years of 1968 and 1970. The success of the first two events likely contributed to the huge turnout of attendees—between 600,000 and 700,000 according to the Guinness World Book of Records—even more than at Woodstock! The line-up of performing artists was around 50 people and included Canadian giants Joni Mitchell and Leonard Cohen, also, Jethro Tull, The Moody Blues, Emerson, Lake & Palmer among many others. The Who played at the festival in both 1969 and 1970—the shows formed part of their Tommy tour with sets focusing on their concept album of the same name. Along with a 35 mm film crew, future Academy Award-winning director Murray Lerner filmed the iconic festival that was later made into a movie called Message of Love: The Isle of Wight Festival: The Movie. A photo essay on the festivals was published by the Guardian and acts as a time capsule that will transport you to a different time and place. Music festivals are still held at the Isle of Wight, but we sincerely doubt that they’re as remarkable as the ones that came before them.

Altamont
[Image: Screen-Shot-2016-05-11-at-10.13.36-AM.png]Photo courtesy of jalopnik.com
On December 6, 1969, the Altamont Speedway Free Festival, a counterculture-era rock concert, featured performances by artists/groups Santana, Jefferson Airplane, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and the Rolling Stones just to name some. The festival is best known for its violence and property damage and was dubbed “rock and roll’s all-time worst day” by Rolling Stone magazine’s staff. Many had hoped it would be Woodstock for the west, but as the festival rolled out it was clear it was nothing like the more peaceful event from Yasgur’s farm. Grace Slick had reportedly said “The vibes were bad. Something was very peculiar, not particularly bad, just real peculiar. It was that kind of hazy, abrasive and unsure day. I had expected the loving vibes of Woodstock but that wasn’t coming at me. This was a whole different thing.

I didn't know size was the defining factor here. I guess you did. We started with that, But I was really just talking about famous music festivals and benefits for that matter. I have no idea what the size of say Glastonbury, Bonaroo, Lollapalooza, Farm aid, Live Aid, Austin City Limits, Altamont, Bangladesh, Tomorrowland, Coachella, Isle of Man and others are famous and the attendance varies.  But they are famous, none the less, and some  with far less attendance than Woodstock or other big ones but still well known. Woodstock was the FIRST really big one, unplanned for at that level and the atmosphere also.
Reply
(01-05-2019, 10:04 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 09:35 PM)Scrapper Wrote: Anyone watching this?
[Image: 0789d3ee8fa3e70cc189b633ad7057a6.jpg]

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
I haven't, but I believe it.

I did watch part of a series that was based on a John Grisham book called the innocent man or something. I watched one episode. It was remarkable how like Making of a murderer it was in look and feel.

I haven't but I would bet money it is greatly exaggerated to make it more interesting.
Reply
(01-06-2019, 03:58 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-06-2019, 02:31 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 08:42 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 08:26 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 07:54 PM)Juniper Wrote: I think Woodstock just made history, that's all. There are plenty of music festivals I haven't heard of.
 This was a very big one like WS. I wonder how many have drawn crowds of 200,000? Plenty? I don't think so. At least not the way it was done in the 70's LOL
Today they have crowds of a million plus but it's nothing like WS the way it's ass super organized.

I understand, but no one knew Woodstock would be so big. And the fact that the trippin' crowd was so happy and for the most part it went so well is what made it historical.  There's been many other festivals since Woodstock, some I've heard of and others not so much.  I've never heard of the Goose Lake festival. I think Woodstock has that lightening in a bottle kind of thing about it that makes it so memorable.  It's sheer size alone (when that was not predicted) and it's kind of acid laced, flower powered mystique add to it's legend. Don't take the brown acid. My daughter would have no idea why that would be so funny now.
I totally agree on what made Woodstock so famous. On the comment you made >>There are plenty of music festivals
I don't agree. I tried to find concerts that had 200 thousand or more that were similar to Woodstock Or Goose lake.
Other than  a few like I posted All I could find were new concerts like Rod Stewart playing to 3 million in Reo or Beyonce .

 
here is one.....


The forgotten festival that was bigger than Woodstock


[/url][url=https://www.thevintagenews.com/2017/04/27/mistinguett-a-french-singer-and-actress-who-in-1919-insured-her-legs-for-500000-francs/]
Apr 27, 2017 Nikola Simonovski
[Image: tt.jpg]
The iconic festival Woodstock is one of the biggest musical events in history. The festival was held at Bethel, New York from 15-18 August 1969 and was visited by more than 400,000 people.
Prominent names such as Janice Joplin, Jimmy Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival and many others took part in the festival, which wanted to spread a message of peace and love.
The original planned length of the festival was 3 days, but it got extended for one more day. When the organizers of the event Michael Lang, John Roberts, Joel Rosenman, and Artie Kornfeld could not find a suitable venue, they decided to throw the party at a dairy farm owned by Max Yasgur.
The hippie gathering was a total success, and even though a few more events with the same name were held, none ever attained the fame of the original Woodstock.
What many people do not know, is that there was another festival held a few years after the famous event but which has now been forgotten, even though it was bigger than Woodstock.



Isle of Wight Festival 1970
[Image: Screen-Shot-2016-05-11-at-10.15.40-AM.png]Photo courtesy of en.wikipedia.org
The Isle of Wight music festival in 1970 was the last of three music festivals to take place on the island between the years of 1968 and 1970. The success of the first two events likely contributed to the huge turnout of attendees—between 600,000 and 700,000 according to the Guinness World Book of Records—even more than at Woodstock! The line-up of performing artists was around 50 people and included Canadian giants Joni Mitchell and Leonard Cohen, also, Jethro Tull, The Moody Blues, Emerson, Lake & Palmer among many others. The Who played at the festival in both 1969 and 1970—the shows formed part of their Tommy tour with sets focusing on their concept album of the same name. Along with a 35 mm film crew, future Academy Award-winning director Murray Lerner filmed the iconic festival that was later made into a movie called Message of Love: The Isle of Wight Festival: The Movie. A photo essay on the festivals was published by the Guardian and acts as a time capsule that will transport you to a different time and place. Music festivals are still held at the Isle of Wight, but we sincerely doubt that they’re as remarkable as the ones that came before them.

Altamont
[Image: Screen-Shot-2016-05-11-at-10.13.36-AM.png]Photo courtesy of jalopnik.com
On December 6, 1969, the Altamont Speedway Free Festival, a counterculture-era rock concert, featured performances by artists/groups Santana, Jefferson Airplane, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and the Rolling Stones just to name some. The festival is best known for its violence and property damage and was dubbed “rock and roll’s all-time worst day” by Rolling Stone magazine’s staff. Many had hoped it would be Woodstock for the west, but as the festival rolled out it was clear it was nothing like the more peaceful event from Yasgur’s farm. Grace Slick had reportedly said “The vibes were bad. Something was very peculiar, not particularly bad, just real peculiar. It was that kind of hazy, abrasive and unsure day. I had expected the loving vibes of Woodstock but that wasn’t coming at me. This was a whole different thing.

I didn't know size was the defining factor here. I guess you did. We started with that, But I was really just talking about famous music festivals and benefits for that matter. I have no idea what the size of say Glastonbury, Bonaroo, Lollapalooza, Farm aid, Live Aid, Austin City Limits, Altamont, Bangladesh, Tomorrowland, Coachella, Isle of Man and others are famous and the attendance varies.  But they are famous, none the less, and some  with far less attendance than Woodstock or other big ones but still well known. Woodstock was the FIRST really big one, unplanned for at that level and the atmosphere also.

Yes size matters Razz I sure as hell was talking about the early concerts, not well planed with hundreds of thousands of people.
To me Woodstock and Goose lake were not just a music festival. I've been to tons of concerts that qualify as a music festivals. But the colossal ones are not so common.
Even in the remote area of Oregon at the Grants Pass race track they had a 2 or three day "music festival".
Reply
(01-06-2019, 04:19 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-06-2019, 03:58 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-06-2019, 02:31 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 08:42 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 08:26 PM)tvguy Wrote:  This was a very big one like WS. I wonder how many have drawn crowds of 200,000? Plenty? I don't think so. At least not the way it was done in the 70's LOL
Today they have crowds of a million plus but it's nothing like WS the way it's ass super organized.

I understand, but no one knew Woodstock would be so big. And the fact that the trippin' crowd was so happy and for the most part it went so well is what made it historical.  There's been many other festivals since Woodstock, some I've heard of and others not so much.  I've never heard of the Goose Lake festival. I think Woodstock has that lightening in a bottle kind of thing about it that makes it so memorable.  It's sheer size alone (when that was not predicted) and it's kind of acid laced, flower powered mystique add to it's legend. Don't take the brown acid. My daughter would have no idea why that would be so funny now.
I totally agree on what made Woodstock so famous. On the comment you made >>There are plenty of music festivals
I don't agree. I tried to find concerts that had 200 thousand or more that were similar to Woodstock Or Goose lake.
Other than  a few like I posted All I could find were new concerts like Rod Stewart playing to 3 million in Reo or Beyonce .

 
here is one.....


The forgotten festival that was bigger than Woodstock


[/url][url=https://www.thevintagenews.com/2017/04/27/mistinguett-a-french-singer-and-actress-who-in-1919-insured-her-legs-for-500000-francs/]
Apr 27, 2017 Nikola Simonovski
[Image: tt.jpg]
The iconic festival Woodstock is one of the biggest musical events in history. The festival was held at Bethel, New York from 15-18 August 1969 and was visited by more than 400,000 people.
Prominent names such as Janice Joplin, Jimmy Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival and many others took part in the festival, which wanted to spread a message of peace and love.
The original planned length of the festival was 3 days, but it got extended for one more day. When the organizers of the event Michael Lang, John Roberts, Joel Rosenman, and Artie Kornfeld could not find a suitable venue, they decided to throw the party at a dairy farm owned by Max Yasgur.
The hippie gathering was a total success, and even though a few more events with the same name were held, none ever attained the fame of the original Woodstock.
What many people do not know, is that there was another festival held a few years after the famous event but which has now been forgotten, even though it was bigger than Woodstock.



Isle of Wight Festival 1970
[Image: Screen-Shot-2016-05-11-at-10.15.40-AM.png]Photo courtesy of en.wikipedia.org
The Isle of Wight music festival in 1970 was the last of three music festivals to take place on the island between the years of 1968 and 1970. The success of the first two events likely contributed to the huge turnout of attendees—between 600,000 and 700,000 according to the Guinness World Book of Records—even more than at Woodstock! The line-up of performing artists was around 50 people and included Canadian giants Joni Mitchell and Leonard Cohen, also, Jethro Tull, The Moody Blues, Emerson, Lake & Palmer among many others. The Who played at the festival in both 1969 and 1970—the shows formed part of their Tommy tour with sets focusing on their concept album of the same name. Along with a 35 mm film crew, future Academy Award-winning director Murray Lerner filmed the iconic festival that was later made into a movie called Message of Love: The Isle of Wight Festival: The Movie. A photo essay on the festivals was published by the Guardian and acts as a time capsule that will transport you to a different time and place. Music festivals are still held at the Isle of Wight, but we sincerely doubt that they’re as remarkable as the ones that came before them.

Altamont
[Image: Screen-Shot-2016-05-11-at-10.13.36-AM.png]Photo courtesy of jalopnik.com
On December 6, 1969, the Altamont Speedway Free Festival, a counterculture-era rock concert, featured performances by artists/groups Santana, Jefferson Airplane, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and the Rolling Stones just to name some. The festival is best known for its violence and property damage and was dubbed “rock and roll’s all-time worst day” by Rolling Stone magazine’s staff. Many had hoped it would be Woodstock for the west, but as the festival rolled out it was clear it was nothing like the more peaceful event from Yasgur’s farm. Grace Slick had reportedly said “The vibes were bad. Something was very peculiar, not particularly bad, just real peculiar. It was that kind of hazy, abrasive and unsure day. I had expected the loving vibes of Woodstock but that wasn’t coming at me. This was a whole different thing.

I didn't know size was the defining factor here. I guess you did. We started with that, But I was really just talking about famous music festivals and benefits for that matter. I have no idea what the size of say Glastonbury, Bonaroo, Lollapalooza, Farm aid, Live Aid, Austin City Limits, Altamont, Bangladesh, Tomorrowland, Coachella, Isle of Man and others are famous and the attendance varies.  But they are famous, none the less, and some  with far less attendance than Woodstock or other big ones but still well known. Woodstock was the FIRST really big one, unplanned for at that level and the atmosphere also.

Yes size matters Razz I sure as hell was talking about the early concerts, not well planed with hundreds of thousands of people.
To me Woodstock and Goose lake were not just a music festival. I've been to tons of concerts that qualify as a music festivals. But the colossal ones are not so common.
Even in the remote area of Oregon at the Grants Pass race track they had a 2 or three day "music festival".

I hear you.  I think  could have only done those when I was young.  I hate crowds now.
Reply
(01-06-2019, 04:25 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-06-2019, 04:19 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-06-2019, 03:58 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(01-06-2019, 02:31 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(01-05-2019, 08:42 PM)Juniper Wrote: I understand, but no one knew Woodstock would be so big. And the fact that the trippin' crowd was so happy and for the most part it went so well is what made it historical.  There's been many other festivals since Woodstock, some I've heard of and others not so much.  I've never heard of the Goose Lake festival. I think Woodstock has that lightening in a bottle kind of thing about it that makes it so memorable.  It's sheer size alone (when that was not predicted) and it's kind of acid laced, flower powered mystique add to it's legend. Don't take the brown acid. My daughter would have no idea why that would be so funny now.
I totally agree on what made Woodstock so famous. On the comment you made >>There are plenty of music festivals
I don't agree. I tried to find concerts that had 200 thousand or more that were similar to Woodstock Or Goose lake.
Other than  a few like I posted All I could find were new concerts like Rod Stewart playing to 3 million in Reo or Beyonce .

 
here is one.....


The forgotten festival that was bigger than Woodstock


[/url][url=https://www.thevintagenews.com/2017/04/27/mistinguett-a-french-singer-and-actress-who-in-1919-insured-her-legs-for-500000-francs/]
Apr 27, 2017 Nikola Simonovski
[Image: tt.jpg]
The iconic festival Woodstock is one of the biggest musical events in history. The festival was held at Bethel, New York from 15-18 August 1969 and was visited by more than 400,000 people.
Prominent names such as Janice Joplin, Jimmy Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival and many others took part in the festival, which wanted to spread a message of peace and love.
The original planned length of the festival was 3 days, but it got extended for one more day. When the organizers of the event Michael Lang, John Roberts, Joel Rosenman, and Artie Kornfeld could not find a suitable venue, they decided to throw the party at a dairy farm owned by Max Yasgur.
The hippie gathering was a total success, and even though a few more events with the same name were held, none ever attained the fame of the original Woodstock.
What many people do not know, is that there was another festival held a few years after the famous event but which has now been forgotten, even though it was bigger than Woodstock.



Isle of Wight Festival 1970
[Image: Screen-Shot-2016-05-11-at-10.15.40-AM.png]Photo courtesy of en.wikipedia.org
The Isle of Wight music festival in 1970 was the last of three music festivals to take place on the island between the years of 1968 and 1970. The success of the first two events likely contributed to the huge turnout of attendees—between 600,000 and 700,000 according to the Guinness World Book of Records—even more than at Woodstock! The line-up of performing artists was around 50 people and included Canadian giants Joni Mitchell and Leonard Cohen, also, Jethro Tull, The Moody Blues, Emerson, Lake & Palmer among many others. The Who played at the festival in both 1969 and 1970—the shows formed part of their Tommy tour with sets focusing on their concept album of the same name. Along with a 35 mm film crew, future Academy Award-winning director Murray Lerner filmed the iconic festival that was later made into a movie called Message of Love: The Isle of Wight Festival: The Movie. A photo essay on the festivals was published by the Guardian and acts as a time capsule that will transport you to a different time and place. Music festivals are still held at the Isle of Wight, but we sincerely doubt that they’re as remarkable as the ones that came before them.

Altamont
[Image: Screen-Shot-2016-05-11-at-10.13.36-AM.png]Photo courtesy of jalopnik.com
On December 6, 1969, the Altamont Speedway Free Festival, a counterculture-era rock concert, featured performances by artists/groups Santana, Jefferson Airplane, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and the Rolling Stones just to name some. The festival is best known for its violence and property damage and was dubbed “rock and roll’s all-time worst day” by Rolling Stone magazine’s staff. Many had hoped it would be Woodstock for the west, but as the festival rolled out it was clear it was nothing like the more peaceful event from Yasgur’s farm. Grace Slick had reportedly said “The vibes were bad. Something was very peculiar, not particularly bad, just real peculiar. It was that kind of hazy, abrasive and unsure day. I had expected the loving vibes of Woodstock but that wasn’t coming at me. This was a whole different thing.

I didn't know size was the defining factor here. I guess you did. We started with that, But I was really just talking about famous music festivals and benefits for that matter. I have no idea what the size of say Glastonbury, Bonaroo, Lollapalooza, Farm aid, Live Aid, Austin City Limits, Altamont, Bangladesh, Tomorrowland, Coachella, Isle of Man and others are famous and the attendance varies.  But they are famous, none the less, and some  with far less attendance than Woodstock or other big ones but still well known. Woodstock was the FIRST really big one, unplanned for at that level and the atmosphere also.

Yes size matters Razz I sure as hell was talking about the early concerts, not well planed with hundreds of thousands of people.
To me Woodstock and Goose lake were not just a music festival. I've been to tons of concerts that qualify as a music festivals. But the colossal ones are not so common.
Even in the remote area of Oregon at the Grants Pass race track they had a 2 or three day "music festival".

I hear you.  I think  could have only done those when I was young.  I hate crowds now.
Me too. I definitely feel the same.

As far as Goose lake. In one way it was way more crazy than Woodstock and I'm not sure there has ever been a festival with so much drugs for sale.
The entire concert was policed by private parties. So drug sales were like nothing I have ever seen since.
There were literally semi trailers full of Marijuana and any drug you could imagine. LSD , mushrooms .. all of it 
Areas were roped off for sales. You could buy anything in any amount.
It's like the entire concert was one giant plan to sell tons of drugs.
Reply
I recently started watching a kinda funny series called Derry Girls. It centers around these 4 or 5 goofy teens in Ireland that get into some trouble. Nothing raunchy... just kinda funny. I've watched the 1st 3 episodes... so far, it's been worth the 25 minutes or so per episode
Reply
(01-06-2019, 05:36 PM)GCG Wrote: I recently started watching a kinda funny series called Derry Girls. It centers around these 4 or 5 goofy teens in Ireland that get into some trouble. Nothing raunchy... just kinda funny. I've watched the 1st 3 episodes... so far, it's been worth the 25 minutes or so per episode

Oh, I've watched 2 or 3 of those.  It's funny.
Reply
I also just watched July 22 about the Norwegian terrorist attack. What struck me most about it was that the far right wing nuts are everywhere, even peaceful Norway.
Reply


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