"The Breach" ....The bastards!
#1
So, they have got into to your credit information? 

Good luck. 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/08/your-...ctionfront
Reply
#2
This is really getting into your breaches, isn't it?

The Feds need to issue everyone a new SS number, they need to make it 10 or 11 numbers too.
Reply
#3
(09-10-2017, 08:43 AM)Wonky3 Wrote: So, they have got into to your credit information? 

Good luck. 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/08/your-...ctionfront

Who is "they?"
Reply
#4
(09-10-2017, 08:43 AM)Wonky3 Wrote: So, they have got into to your credit information? 

Good luck. 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/08/your-...ctionfront

This looks like an advertisement to me.
Reply
#5
Equifax seems to have their web page fixed so you can check if they think your information was compromised. There isn't any agreement to acknowledge and you get an answer that isn't too ambiguous. Previously I saw reports that no matter what name and info you entered you always got a message that you may be at risk.
Reply
#6
(09-10-2017, 12:07 PM)Cuzz Wrote: Equifax seems to have their web page fixed so you can check if they think your information was compromised. There isn't any agreement to acknowledge and you get an answer that isn't too ambiguous. Previously I saw reports that no matter what name and info you entered you always got a message that you may be at risk.

That's true. However....
You might want to check this out:

http://medfordmailtribune.or.newsmemory....VhYXBxTXlo=

I've spent HOURS trying to put a "Freeze" on all my accounts at all three credit agencies. Still struggling with one and have grown even older on the phone with poorly trained folks. (And in Oregon it requires 10 bucks to freeze at each agency...that's 60 dollars for wife and I) 

NEW YORK — A day after credit-reporting company Equifax disclosed that “criminals” had stolen vital data about 143 million Americans, it had somehow managed to leave much of the public in the dark about their exposure, how they should protect themselves and what Equifax planned to do for those affected.
The breach is unquestionably serious.
It exposed crucial pieces of personal data that criminals could use to commit identity theft, from Social Security numbers and birthdates to address histories and legal names.
That data — the “crown jewels of personal information,” in the words of independent credit analyst John Ulzheimer — can’t be changed, and once it’s in circulation, it’s basically out there forever.
But Equifax’s response has satisfied almost no one.
Unhappiness everywhere
Consumers complained of jammed phone lines and uninformed representatives. An Equifax website set up to help people determine their exposure looked like a scam to some, and provided inconsistent and unhelpful information to others. Congress planned hearings.
Reply
#7
(09-10-2017, 01:27 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 12:07 PM)Cuzz Wrote: Equifax seems to have their web page fixed so you can check if they think your information was compromised. There isn't any agreement to acknowledge and you get an answer that isn't too ambiguous. Previously I saw reports that no matter what name and info you entered you always got a message that you may be at risk.

That's true. However....
You might want to check this out:

http://medfordmailtribune.or.newsmemory....VhYXBxTXlo=

NEW YORK — A day after credit-reporting company Equifax disclosed that “criminals” had stolen vital data about 143 million Americans, it had somehow managed to leave much of the public in the dark about their exposure, how they should protect themselves and what Equifax planned to do for those affected.
The breach is unquestionably serious.
It exposed crucial pieces of personal data that criminals could use to commit identity theft, from Social Security numbers and birthdates to address histories and legal names.
That data — the “crown jewels of personal information,” in the words of independent credit analyst John Ulzheimer — can’t be changed, and once it’s in circulation, it’s basically out there forever.
But Equifax’s response has satisfied almost no one.
Unhappiness everywhere
Consumers complained of jammed phone lines and uninformed representatives. An Equifax website set up to help people determine their exposure looked like a scam to some, and provided inconsistent and unhelpful information to others. Congress planned hearings.

Yeah, nothing new there.

I can't change what's been done and I can't change the system. I can only try to protect myself as best I can. I see no good that can come from fretting about it now.

I've frozen my credit and I'll continue to watch my CC and bank accounts. I have no plans to need new  credit for a year or two so it isn't a hardship. There's not much else I can do.
Reply
#8
(09-10-2017, 01:27 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 12:07 PM)Cuzz Wrote: Equifax seems to have their web page fixed so you can check if they think your information was compromised. There isn't any agreement to acknowledge and you get an answer that isn't too ambiguous. Previously I saw reports that no matter what name and info you entered you always got a message that you may be at risk.

That's true. However....
You might want to check this out:

http://medfordmailtribune.or.newsmemory....VhYXBxTXlo=

I've spent HOURS trying to put a "Freeze" on all my accounts at all three credit agencies. Still struggling with one and have grown even older on the phone with poorly trained folks. (And in Oregon it requires 10 bucks to freeze at each agency...that's 60 dollars for wife and I) 

NEW YORK — A day after credit-reporting company Equifax disclosed that “criminals” had stolen vital data about 143 million Americans, it had somehow managed to leave much of the public in the dark about their exposure, how they should protect themselves and what Equifax planned to do for those affected.
The breach is unquestionably serious.
It exposed crucial pieces of personal data that criminals could use to commit identity theft, from Social Security numbers and birthdates to address histories and legal names.
That data — the “crown jewels of personal information,” in the words of independent credit analyst John Ulzheimer — can’t be changed, and once it’s in circulation, it’s basically out there forever.
But Equifax’s response has satisfied almost no one.
Unhappiness everywhere
Consumers complained of jammed phone lines and uninformed representatives. An Equifax website set up to help people determine their exposure looked like a scam to some, and provided inconsistent and unhelpful information to others. Congress planned hearings.

Why is it that hard to report a credit card being stolen or to get a freeze on my cards?

My money comes from my pensions and from social security. My biggest pension is ALL with Edward Jones.
So no one can really take MY money. All they can do is take money from whatever credit card companies I have.
I realize My credit could be damaged but I rarely use a credit card anyway other than buying things on the internet.
And I could still do most of that with Paypal.

It's kind of funny. I remember when my social security number 346-68-6456 was written in big bold numbers right on the side of my army duffle bag. I keep it well hidden now Razz
Reply
#9
(09-10-2017, 01:49 PM)Cuzz Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 01:27 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 12:07 PM)Cuzz Wrote: Equifax seems to have their web page fixed so you can check if they think your information was compromised. There isn't any agreement to acknowledge and you get an answer that isn't too ambiguous. Previously I saw reports that no matter what name and info you entered you always got a message that you may be at risk.

That's true. However....
You might want to check this out:

http://medfordmailtribune.or.newsmemory....VhYXBxTXlo=

NEW YORK — A day after credit-reporting company Equifax disclosed that “criminals” had stolen vital data about 143 million Americans, it had somehow managed to leave much of the public in the dark about their exposure, how they should protect themselves and what Equifax planned to do for those affected.
The breach is unquestionably serious.
It exposed crucial pieces of personal data that criminals could use to commit identity theft, from Social Security numbers and birthdates to address histories and legal names.
That data — the “crown jewels of personal information,” in the words of independent credit analyst John Ulzheimer — can’t be changed, and once it’s in circulation, it’s basically out there forever.
But Equifax’s response has satisfied almost no one.
Unhappiness everywhere
Consumers complained of jammed phone lines and uninformed representatives. An Equifax website set up to help people determine their exposure looked like a scam to some, and provided inconsistent and unhelpful information to others. Congress planned hearings.

Yeah, nothing new there.

I can't change what's been done and I can't change the system. I can only try to protect myself as best I can. I see no good that can come from fretting about it now.

I've frozen my credit and I'll continue to watch my CC and bank accounts. I have no plans to need new  credit for a year or two so it isn't a hardship. There's not much else I can do.

Yep. That's it and it looks like you got it covered.
I misread your previous post...thought you were suggesting there was no need to freeze the accounts. 
I'm blessed in a way: At this time of life I don't intend to ask for more credit of any kind. But...Don't want some ass whipe getting ahold of the deed to my house and taking out a 50K loan for improvements. Then it's up to ME to prove I didn't ask for the loan or get the money. System stinks. Government TOO big? Maybe. But who other than a government agency is equipped to provide oversight for this kind of stuff. And we DO need oversight. 
SAVING AND LOAN, ENRON and THE BANKS all over again. (Or something like that)  

Oh well. Thank the gods the wind in not blowing 150MPH in the Valley of the Rogue. In time, the rains will come and the fires will die. I feel bad for the folks who lived in the woods and got burned out. On the other hand, I'd never live in the woods...that's just me. 

"If it ain't one thing, it's t'other"
Reply
#10
(09-10-2017, 02:38 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 01:49 PM)Cuzz Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 01:27 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 12:07 PM)Cuzz Wrote: Equifax seems to have their web page fixed so you can check if they think your information was compromised. There isn't any agreement to acknowledge and you get an answer that isn't too ambiguous. Previously I saw reports that no matter what name and info you entered you always got a message that you may be at risk.

That's true. However....
You might want to check this out:

http://medfordmailtribune.or.newsmemory....VhYXBxTXlo=

NEW YORK — A day after credit-reporting company Equifax disclosed that “criminals” had stolen vital data about 143 million Americans, it had somehow managed to leave much of the public in the dark about their exposure, how they should protect themselves and what Equifax planned to do for those affected.
The breach is unquestionably serious.
It exposed crucial pieces of personal data that criminals could use to commit identity theft, from Social Security numbers and birthdates to address histories and legal names.
That data — the “crown jewels of personal information,” in the words of independent credit analyst John Ulzheimer — can’t be changed, and once it’s in circulation, it’s basically out there forever.
But Equifax’s response has satisfied almost no one.
Unhappiness everywhere
Consumers complained of jammed phone lines and uninformed representatives. An Equifax website set up to help people determine their exposure looked like a scam to some, and provided inconsistent and unhelpful information to others. Congress planned hearings.

Yeah, nothing new there.

I can't change what's been done and I can't change the system. I can only try to protect myself as best I can. I see no good that can come from fretting about it now.

I've frozen my credit and I'll continue to watch my CC and bank accounts. I have no plans to need new  credit for a year or two so it isn't a hardship. There's not much else I can do.

Yep. That's it and it looks like you got it covered.
I misread your previous post...thought you were suggesting there was no need to freeze the accounts. 
I'm blessed in a way: At this time of life I don't intend to ask for more credit of any kind. But...Don't want some ass whipe getting ahold of the deed to my house and taking out a 50K loan for improvements. Then it's up to ME to prove I didn't ask for the loan or get the money. System stinks. Government TOO big? Maybe. But who other than a government agency is equipped to provide oversight for this kind of stuff. And we DO need oversight. 
SAVING AND LOAN, ENRON and THE BANKS all over again. (Or something like that)  

Oh well. Thank the gods the wind in not blowing 150MPH in the Valley of the Rogue. In time, the rains will come and the fires will die. I feel bad for the folks who lived in the woods and got burned out. On the other hand, I'd never live in the woods...that's just me. 

"If it ain't one thing, it's t'other"

Well we don't have any intentions of getting rid of our credit cards so maybe I don't "have it covered" What good would freezing my accounts do if I just have to opens another?|
I mean IF my SS number is already out there?

BTW I did live in the woods and I was evacuated back in the 90's. I got the whole fam damily out including dogs and livestock.
The fire fighters pretty much saved my house. And then some lying ass timber company got permission to log fire damaged timber and proceeded to clear cut some beautiful timber that was not even touched by the fire.
Reply
#11
(09-10-2017, 02:47 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 02:38 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 01:49 PM)Cuzz Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 01:27 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 12:07 PM)Cuzz Wrote: Equifax seems to have their web page fixed so you can check if they think your information was compromised. There isn't any agreement to acknowledge and you get an answer that isn't too ambiguous. Previously I saw reports that no matter what name and info you entered you always got a message that you may be at risk.

That's true. However....
You might want to check this out:

http://medfordmailtribune.or.newsmemory....VhYXBxTXlo=

NEW YORK — A day after credit-reporting company Equifax disclosed that “criminals” had stolen vital data about 143 million Americans, it had somehow managed to leave much of the public in the dark about their exposure, how they should protect themselves and what Equifax planned to do for those affected.
The breach is unquestionably serious.
It exposed crucial pieces of personal data that criminals could use to commit identity theft, from Social Security numbers and birthdates to address histories and legal names.
That data — the “crown jewels of personal information,” in the words of independent credit analyst John Ulzheimer — can’t be changed, and once it’s in circulation, it’s basically out there forever.
But Equifax’s response has satisfied almost no one.
Unhappiness everywhere
Consumers complained of jammed phone lines and uninformed representatives. An Equifax website set up to help people determine their exposure looked like a scam to some, and provided inconsistent and unhelpful information to others. Congress planned hearings.

Yeah, nothing new there.

I can't change what's been done and I can't change the system. I can only try to protect myself as best I can. I see no good that can come from fretting about it now.

I've frozen my credit and I'll continue to watch my CC and bank accounts. I have no plans to need new  credit for a year or two so it isn't a hardship. There's not much else I can do.

Yep. That's it and it looks like you got it covered.
I misread your previous post...thought you were suggesting there was no need to freeze the accounts. 
I'm blessed in a way: At this time of life I don't intend to ask for more credit of any kind. But...Don't want some ass whipe getting ahold of the deed to my house and taking out a 50K loan for improvements. Then it's up to ME to prove I didn't ask for the loan or get the money. System stinks. Government TOO big? Maybe. But who other than a government agency is equipped to provide oversight for this kind of stuff. And we DO need oversight. 
SAVING AND LOAN, ENRON and THE BANKS all over again. (Or something like that)  

Oh well. Thank the gods the wind in not blowing 150MPH in the Valley of the Rogue. In time, the rains will come and the fires will die. I feel bad for the folks who lived in the woods and got burned out. On the other hand, I'd never live in the woods...that's just me. 

"If it ain't one thing, it's t'other"

Well we don't have any intentions of getting rid of our credit cards so maybe I don't "have it covered" What good would freezing my accounts do if I just have to opens another?|
I mean IF my SS number is already out there?

BTW I did live in the woods and I was evacuated back in the 90's. I got the whole fam damily out including dogs and livestock.
The fire fighters pretty much saved my house. And then some lying ass timber company got permission to log fire damaged timber and proceeded to clear cut some beautiful timber that was not even touched by the fire.

You don't need to close your credit card accounts, just watch your statements closely for unknown charges.

Freezing your credit basically means that credit reports will not be issued for most requests. So, new accounts, loans, new insurance, stuff like that can't be opened in your name and SS#. No one is going to initiate new accounts if they can't check your credit report. Costs about $10 per credit agency (Equifax, Experian and Transunion) though Equifax didn't seem to charge me (guilt?). You have to un-freeze them if you want to open a new account yourself (another $10). If you do, read all the fine print so you understand what your doing and DON"T lose your PIN for un-freezing!

Freezing is a long term thing that has to be done and undone. But for me, I'm not planning to need any new credit for a couple years so no big deal. For short term you can put a fraud alert on your credit report. It lasts 90 days and can be renewed. It will cause any merchant looking to extend credit to your name to contact you before approving the new credit. It lets you know someone is trying to use your information without you knowing.

Research on the internet for more information. It's all out there and pretty easy to do.

BTW - I lived in the woods once too. One fire came towards us but was stopped before any damage came too close. This year, if I as still there, we'd be under a level two evacuation order right now. But then, living in town doesn't always mean you're safe either.
Reply
#12
(09-10-2017, 03:24 PM)Cuzz Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 02:47 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 02:38 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 01:49 PM)Cuzz Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 01:27 PM)Wonky3 Wrote: That's true. However....
You might want to check this out:

http://medfordmailtribune.or.newsmemory....VhYXBxTXlo=

NEW YORK — A day after credit-reporting company Equifax disclosed that “criminals” had stolen vital data about 143 million Americans, it had somehow managed to leave much of the public in the dark about their exposure, how they should protect themselves and what Equifax planned to do for those affected.
The breach is unquestionably serious.
It exposed crucial pieces of personal data that criminals could use to commit identity theft, from Social Security numbers and birthdates to address histories and legal names.
That data — the “crown jewels of personal information,” in the words of independent credit analyst John Ulzheimer — can’t be changed, and once it’s in circulation, it’s basically out there forever.
But Equifax’s response has satisfied almost no one.
Unhappiness everywhere
Consumers complained of jammed phone lines and uninformed representatives. An Equifax website set up to help people determine their exposure looked like a scam to some, and provided inconsistent and unhelpful information to others. Congress planned hearings.

Yeah, nothing new there.

I can't change what's been done and I can't change the system. I can only try to protect myself as best I can. I see no good that can come from fretting about it now.

I've frozen my credit and I'll continue to watch my CC and bank accounts. I have no plans to need new  credit for a year or two so it isn't a hardship. There's not much else I can do.

Yep. That's it and it looks like you got it covered.
I misread your previous post...thought you were suggesting there was no need to freeze the accounts. 
I'm blessed in a way: At this time of life I don't intend to ask for more credit of any kind. But...Don't want some ass whipe getting ahold of the deed to my house and taking out a 50K loan for improvements. Then it's up to ME to prove I didn't ask for the loan or get the money. System stinks. Government TOO big? Maybe. But who other than a government agency is equipped to provide oversight for this kind of stuff. And we DO need oversight. 
SAVING AND LOAN, ENRON and THE BANKS all over again. (Or something like that)  

Oh well. Thank the gods the wind in not blowing 150MPH in the Valley of the Rogue. In time, the rains will come and the fires will die. I feel bad for the folks who lived in the woods and got burned out. On the other hand, I'd never live in the woods...that's just me. 

"If it ain't one thing, it's t'other"

Well we don't have any intentions of getting rid of our credit cards so maybe I don't "have it covered" What good would freezing my accounts do if I just have to opens another?|
I mean IF my SS number is already out there?

BTW I did live in the woods and I was evacuated back in the 90's. I got the whole fam damily out including dogs and livestock.
The fire fighters pretty much saved my house. And then some lying ass timber company got permission to log fire damaged timber and proceeded to clear cut some beautiful timber that was not even touched by the fire.

You don't need to close your credit card accounts, just watch your statements closely for unknown charges.

Freezing your credit basically means that credit reports will not be issued for most requests. So, new accounts, loans, new insurance, stuff like that can't be opened in your name and SS#. No one is going to initiate new accounts if they can't check your credit report. Costs about $10 per credit agency (Equifax, Experian and Transunion) though Equifax didn't seem to charge me (guilt?). You have to un-freeze them if you want to open a new account yourself (another $10). If you do, read all the fine print so you understand what your doing and DON"T lose your PIN for un-freezing!

Freezing is a long term thing that has to be done and undone. But for me, I'm not planning to need any new credit for a couple years so no big deal. For short term you can put a fraud alert on your credit report. It lasts 90 days and can be renewed. It will cause any merchant looking to extend credit to your name to contact you before approving the new credit. It lets you know someone is trying to use your information without you knowing.

Research on the internet for more information. It's all out there and pretty easy to do.

BTW - I lived in the woods once too. One fire came towards us but was stopped before any damage came too close. This year, if I as still there, we'd be under a level two evacuation order right now. But then, living in town doesn't always mean you're safe either.
Thanks. Good info but I'll probably just be a bump on a log and do nothing.
Reply
#13
I stopped assuming years ago any of my data is secure, fact is companies suck at securing our data. I always monitor bank accounts and cc card, and while we actually know about this breach, there is probably half a dozen others we will never know about, so i don't stress on it. If it happens it happens.
Reply
#14
(09-10-2017, 03:34 PM)GPnative Wrote: I stopped assuming years ago any of my data is secure, fact is companies suck at securing our data.  I always monitor bank accounts and cc card, and while we actually know about this breach, there is probably half a dozen others we will never know about, so i don't stress on it. If it happens it happens.

I admire your ability to accept whatever comes.
This stuff is not just about credit cards or bank accounts.
The credit rating companies have about all the information about you that is available. 
When someone (others) steal your identity it can literally ruin your life. 
As you know, when you "freeze" the account with the credit agencies, it prevents others from using your name in any fraudulent activity. (And you must "unfreeze" it to open any other account, then freeze it again...a hassle)
If not protected and someone gets a loan (of any kind) using your name, you must prove it was not you. That can be very expensive and take lots of time. 
But I only know what I read in the popular press and online sites I think are legit. 
To each his own. 
Good luck.
Reply
#15
(09-10-2017, 07:28 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 03:34 PM)GPnative Wrote: I stopped assuming years ago any of my data is secure, fact is companies suck at securing our data.  I always monitor bank accounts and cc card, and while we actually know about this breach, there is probably half a dozen others we will never know about, so i don't stress on it. If it happens it happens.

I admire your ability to accept whatever comes.
This stuff is not just about credit cards or bank accounts.
The credit rating companies have about all the information about you that is available. 
When someone (others) steal your identity it can literally ruin your life. 
As you know, when you "freeze" the account with the credit agencies, it prevents others from using your name in any fraudulent activity. (And you must "unfreeze" it to open any other account, then freeze it again...a hassle)
If not protected and someone gets a loan (of any kind) using your name, you must prove it was not you. That can be very expensive and take lots of time. 
But I only know what I read in the popular press and online sites I think are legit. 
To each his own. 
Good luck.

Meh

Oh, and cleaning out your bank account is by far the most instantly damaging, royal pain in the ass to deal with. That is far more concerning to me. The other, yea it would suck, but it's not the end of the world. All of us are subject to identity theft on any given day, you have more risk from a drugged out extended family member then a multi million person hack.
Reply
#16
(09-10-2017, 07:28 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 03:34 PM)GPnative Wrote: I stopped assuming years ago any of my data is secure, fact is companies suck at securing our data.  I always monitor bank accounts and cc card, and while we actually know about this breach, there is probably half a dozen others we will never know about, so i don't stress on it. If it happens it happens.

I admire your ability to accept whatever comes.
This stuff is not just about credit cards or bank accounts.
The credit rating companies have about all the information about you that is available. 
When someone (others) steal your identity it can literally ruin your life. 
As you know, when you "freeze" the account with the credit agencies, it prevents others from using your name in any fraudulent activity. (And you must "unfreeze" it to open any other account, then freeze it again...a hassle)
If not protected and someone gets a loan (of any kind) using your name, you must prove it was not you. That can be very expensive and take lots of time. 
But I only know what I read in the popular press and online sites I think are legit. 
To each his own. 
Good luck.

If not protected and someone gets a loan (of any kind) using your name, you must prove it was not you. That can be very expensive and take lots of time.

So there is no record of me ever talking to ANYONE about a loan. NO one EVER saw me get a loan. MY signature is not on one single piece of paper.
And I have to prove I didn't get a loan?

I don't think so. THEY have to prove I have their money... period. It may take a lot of time but I'm not shelling out money to an attorney. They would have to in order to get anywhere.
In short I don't have to prove shit.

I could be wrong. I'm just running on common sense and logic although i know sometimes that's not enough Big Grin
Reply
#17
(09-10-2017, 09:31 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 07:28 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 03:34 PM)GPnative Wrote: I stopped assuming years ago any of my data is secure, fact is companies suck at securing our data.  I always monitor bank accounts and cc card, and while we actually know about this breach, there is probably half a dozen others we will never know about, so i don't stress on it. If it happens it happens.

I admire your ability to accept whatever comes.
This stuff is not just about credit cards or bank accounts.
The credit rating companies have about all the information about you that is available. 
When someone (others) steal your identity it can literally ruin your life. 
As you know, when you "freeze" the account with the credit agencies, it prevents others from using your name in any fraudulent activity. (And you must "unfreeze" it to open any other account, then freeze it again...a hassle)
If not protected and someone gets a loan (of any kind) using your name, you must prove it was not you. That can be very expensive and take lots of time. 
But I only know what I read in the popular press and online sites I think are legit. 
To each his own. 
Good luck.

If not protected and someone gets a loan (of any kind) using your name, you must prove it was not you. That can be very expensive and take lots of time.

So there is no record of me ever talking to ANYONE about a loan. NO one EVER saw me get a loan. MY signature is not on one single piece of paper.
And I have to prove I didn't get a loan?

I don't think so. THEY have to prove I have their money... period. It may take a lot of time but I'm not shelling out money to an attorney. They would have to in order to get anywhere.
In short I don't have to prove shit.

I could be wrong. I'm just running on common sense and logic although i know sometimes that's not enough Big Grin


If they claim you took out a loan and defaulted, and that statement hurts you in getting a loan, you applied for, then that's libel.

You need a lawyer to sue their ass.
Reply
#18
Has anyone here actually entered their creds into the Experian site to see which of 2 response screens you get? I entered some fake info and it said it was not part of the hack.
I'm a little leery of entering my real personal data into their shit show, even if it is only 6 digits of the SSN.

https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/potential-impact/
Reply
#19
(09-11-2017, 05:31 AM)chuck white Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 09:31 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 07:28 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 03:34 PM)GPnative Wrote: I stopped assuming years ago any of my data is secure, fact is companies suck at securing our data.  I always monitor bank accounts and cc card, and while we actually know about this breach, there is probably half a dozen others we will never know about, so i don't stress on it. If it happens it happens.

I admire your ability to accept whatever comes.
This stuff is not just about credit cards or bank accounts.
The credit rating companies have about all the information about you that is available. 
When someone (others) steal your identity it can literally ruin your life. 
As you know, when you "freeze" the account with the credit agencies, it prevents others from using your name in any fraudulent activity. (And you must "unfreeze" it to open any other account, then freeze it again...a hassle)
If not protected and someone gets a loan (of any kind) using your name, you must prove it was not you. That can be very expensive and take lots of time. 
But I only know what I read in the popular press and online sites I think are legit. 
To each his own. 
Good luck.

If not protected and someone gets a loan (of any kind) using your name, you must prove it was not you. That can be very expensive and take lots of time.

So there is no record of me ever talking to ANYONE about a loan. NO one EVER saw me get a loan. MY signature is not on one single piece of paper.
And I have to prove I didn't get a loan?

I don't think so. THEY have to prove I have their money... period. It may take a lot of time but I'm not shelling out money to an attorney. They would have to in order to get anywhere.
In short I don't have to prove shit.

I could be wrong. I'm just running on common sense and logic although i know sometimes that's not enough Big Grin


If they claim you took out a loan and defaulted, and that statement hurts you in getting a loan, you applied for, then that's libel.

You need a lawyer to sue their ass.

Yep.
But hey, let "common sense" rule, cause I don't want to be that asshole that "tells everyone what  do do" or poses as "the all knowing expert" about the difference between "how we feel about stuff" and facts, historical or otherwise. (For instance, I don't truly understand all the different conditions that lead to forest fires that burn hotter and longer than ever, but I'd bet logging techniques are but one factor. I've read that not all logging practices are the same and that those practices can make a significant difference. Whatever: Only an observation about the complexities of issues, and THIS issue of our credit information being stolen might be another example of our need to understand the full and complete implications that may threaten us) 

From the things I've been reading in the NYT, "The Post", updates from The Atlantic, New Yorker, Harpers, and web sites I value, this is an extreme and highly unusual breach of our personal information that goes far beyond previous hacks reported. 

Lots of information out there. Here is but one example: It's from a group that includes the very assholes who allowed the hack, but the information is valid regardless of their lapse in guarding our information. 


https://www.csid.com/2016/09/real-cost-identity-theft/

Another take on it:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/08/busin...ction&_r=0
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#20
(09-11-2017, 08:28 AM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-11-2017, 05:31 AM)chuck white Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 09:31 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 07:28 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(09-10-2017, 03:34 PM)GPnative Wrote: I stopped assuming years ago any of my data is secure, fact is companies suck at securing our data.  I always monitor bank accounts and cc card, and while we actually know about this breach, there is probably half a dozen others we will never know about, so i don't stress on it. If it happens it happens.

I admire your ability to accept whatever comes.
This stuff is not just about credit cards or bank accounts.
The credit rating companies have about all the information about you that is available. 
When someone (others) steal your identity it can literally ruin your life. 
As you know, when you "freeze" the account with the credit agencies, it prevents others from using your name in any fraudulent activity. (And you must "unfreeze" it to open any other account, then freeze it again...a hassle)
If not protected and someone gets a loan (of any kind) using your name, you must prove it was not you. That can be very expensive and take lots of time. 
But I only know what I read in the popular press and online sites I think are legit. 
To each his own. 
Good luck.

If not protected and someone gets a loan (of any kind) using your name, you must prove it was not you. That can be very expensive and take lots of time.

So there is no record of me ever talking to ANYONE about a loan. NO one EVER saw me get a loan. MY signature is not on one single piece of paper.
And I have to prove I didn't get a loan?

I don't think so. THEY have to prove I have their money... period. It may take a lot of time but I'm not shelling out money to an attorney. They would have to in order to get anywhere.
In short I don't have to prove shit.

I could be wrong. I'm just running on common sense and logic although i know sometimes that's not enough Big Grin


If they claim you took out a loan and defaulted, and that statement hurts you in getting a loan, you applied for, then that's libel.

You need a lawyer to sue their ass.

Yep.
But hey, let "common sense" rule, cause I don't want to be that asshole that "tells everyone what  do do" or poses as "the all knowing expert" about the difference between "how we feel about stuff" and facts, historical or otherwise. (For instance, I don't truly understand all the different conditions that lead to forest fires that burn hotter and longer than ever, but I'd bet logging techniques are but one factor. I've read that not all logging practices are the same and that those practices can make a significant difference. Whatever: Only an observation about the complexities of issues, and THIS issue of our credit information being stolen might be another example of our need to understand the full and complete implications that may threaten us) 

From the things I've been reading in the NYT, "The Post", updates from The Atlantic, New Yorker, Harpers, and web sites I value, this is an extreme and highly unusual breach of our personal information that goes far beyond previous hacks reported. 

Lots of information out there. Here is but one example: It's from a group that includes the very assholes who allowed the hack, but the information is valid regardless of their lapse in guarding our information. 


https://www.csid.com/2016/09/real-cost-identity-theft/

Another take on it:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/08/busin...ction&_r=0
 For instance, I don't truly understand all the different conditions that lead to forest fires that burn hotter and longer than ever, but I'd bet logging techniques are but one factor. I've read that not all logging practices are the same and that those practices can make a significant difference.


That would be a good bet because it's proven that areas we have logged burn easier, hotter and with more destruction.
Versus old growth forests with large OLD trees. I notice that Larry who just blew off my comments and accused me of regurgitating data from an extremist Enviro web site.

  Larry has a very poor memory because I have been saying the same thing about our logging practices on this forum for over a decade.
 And so far Larry hasn't explained why before white man started cutting trees there were so many ancient trees.
One would have to assume one of two things. There didn't used to be forest fires. Which is moronic.

OR the giant trees didn't burn in the less destructive fires from that period.

WE created the structure of today's Forests by removing the biggest, oldest, most valuable and the most fire resistant trees.
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