Feeling Tense?
#21
(11-18-2017, 08:28 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 08:24 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 08:07 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 06:14 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 04:12 PM)Juniper Wrote: Well, it's not that people aren't breathing correctly or anything, it's just a form of natural manipulation. We all have muscle, but if we exercise and feed it properly we can have stronger muscles.
Right. The human body has a natural reaction to being over worked and builds muscle.


  We all produce natural endorphins, dopamine, oxytocin, but there things people do to increase the release or effect of these: Exercise, pain, alcohol, drugs, sugar, fats (why people crave those foods) all do this.  This is just another version of that.

I believe that endorphins are released when we do things that our body needs as a form of payment. The same reason sex feels good Razz


I believe controlled breathing helps to release more serotonin, which is a mood hormone, and endorphin a pain killing hormone and dopamine and others.  Our bodies can be manipulated to go from an anaerobic state to an aerobic state that creates feelings of well being. So, there's some science behind it.
Still not totally convinced Why it works but I believe it does work. Big Grin

So all those heavy breathers who call people and say nothing... Might not be creepy after all?

Well, what I want to know is, if the body can release all these powerful hormones why don't they do it better?  Like why not just some pain?  Why can't the body reduce great pain? Or correct depression?

Great pain is there for a reason. It's your body trying to tell you to stop doing whatever it is you are doing that causes the pain. I know that's a DUH comment but it's true.
I think it's from the reptilian part of out brain, like instinct.
Maybe as we continue to evolve in 20 thousand years or so our body will learn to control pain better.
But the pain we feel is why we survived until now.
No, great pain wouldn't be necessary.  Just enough pain would keep most people safe. What I'm saying is, when an extreme traumatic injury or disease takes place, why doesn't enough dopamine kick in to help it out?
You are not arguing against me. You are arguing against evolution. If great pain was not necessary than people who experienced great pain would not have survived.
But they did so it most certainly was beneficial for those who had it, dealt with it and survived.Which includes all of us.
And like I said. Great pain is probably not as necessary as it was in the past and given time people who experienced less pain may survive in numbers enough to change things.
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#22
I wonder if that trick could work for blood as well as air.

You know pump the blood out of your heart, twice as long as you pumped it in?
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#23
(11-18-2017, 09:01 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 08:28 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 08:24 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 08:07 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 06:14 PM)tvguy Wrote: Still not totally convinced Why it works but I believe it does work. Big Grin

So all those heavy breathers who call people and say nothing... Might not be creepy after all?

Well, what I want to know is, if the body can release all these powerful hormones why don't they do it better?  Like why not just some pain?  Why can't the body reduce great pain? Or correct depression?

Great pain is there for a reason. It's your body trying to tell you to stop doing whatever it is you are doing that causes the pain. I know that's a DUH comment but it's true.
I think it's from the reptilian part of out brain, like instinct.
Maybe as we continue to evolve in 20 thousand years or so our body will learn to control pain better.
But the pain we feel is why we survived until now.
No, great pain wouldn't be necessary.  Just enough pain would keep most people safe. What I'm saying is, when an extreme traumatic injury or disease takes place, why doesn't enough dopamine kick in to help it out?
You are not arguing against me. You are arguing against evolution. If great pain was not necessary than people who experienced great pain would not have survived.
But they did so it most certainly was beneficial for those who had it, dealt with it and survived.Which includes all of us.
And like I said. Great pain is probably not as necessary as it was in the past and given time people who experienced less pain may survive in numbers enough to change things.

Curious and interesting. Evolution is thing to be amazed by, proving the resilience of nature and the wonder of what we have come to call "Natural Selection" (Darwin didn't). I'm not schooled or bright enough to really understand it, but am still amazed by what I know. 
But pain and evolution? That I wonder about. Whatever...on long dark winter days it's enough to give us food for thought.
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#24
(Yesterday, 10:13 AM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 09:01 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 08:28 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 08:24 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 08:07 PM)Juniper Wrote: Well, what I want to know is, if the body can release all these powerful hormones why don't they do it better?  Like why not just some pain?  Why can't the body reduce great pain? Or correct depression?

Great pain is there for a reason. It's your body trying to tell you to stop doing whatever it is you are doing that causes the pain. I know that's a DUH comment but it's true.
I think it's from the reptilian part of out brain, like instinct.
Maybe as we continue to evolve in 20 thousand years or so our body will learn to control pain better.
But the pain we feel is why we survived until now.
No, great pain wouldn't be necessary.  Just enough pain would keep most people safe. What I'm saying is, when an extreme traumatic injury or disease takes place, why doesn't enough dopamine kick in to help it out?
You are not arguing against me. You are arguing against evolution. If great pain was not necessary than people who experienced great pain would not have survived.
But they did so it most certainly was beneficial for those who had it, dealt with it and survived.Which includes all of us.
And like I said. Great pain is probably not as necessary as it was in the past and given time people who experienced less pain may survive in numbers enough to change things.

Curious and interesting. Evolution is thing to be amazed by, proving the resilience of nature and the wonder of what we have come to call "Natural Selection" (Darwin didn't). I'm not schooled or bright enough to really understand it, but am still amazed by what I know. 
But pain and evolution? That I wonder about. Whatever...on long dark winter days it's enough to give us food for thought.
Well if you think about it the concept is simple. What ever worked for humans and helped them survive. Was passed down among those individuals.
It just seems logical that humans who experienced great pain would be much more apt to do things in a manner to limit the possibility of hurting ones self.
Therefore surviving and having children with the same traits more often than those who's pain was not as intense.
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#25
(Yesterday, 01:58 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(Yesterday, 10:13 AM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 09:01 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 08:28 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 08:24 PM)tvguy Wrote: Great pain is there for a reason. It's your body trying to tell you to stop doing whatever it is you are doing that causes the pain. I know that's a DUH comment but it's true.
I think it's from the reptilian part of out brain, like instinct.
Maybe as we continue to evolve in 20 thousand years or so our body will learn to control pain better.
But the pain we feel is why we survived until now.
No, great pain wouldn't be necessary.  Just enough pain would keep most people safe. What I'm saying is, when an extreme traumatic injury or disease takes place, why doesn't enough dopamine kick in to help it out?
You are not arguing against me. You are arguing against evolution. If great pain was not necessary than people who experienced great pain would not have survived.
But they did so it most certainly was beneficial for those who had it, dealt with it and survived.Which includes all of us.
And like I said. Great pain is probably not as necessary as it was in the past and given time people who experienced less pain may survive in numbers enough to change things.

Curious and interesting. Evolution is thing to be amazed by, proving the resilience of nature and the wonder of what we have come to call "Natural Selection" (Darwin didn't). I'm not schooled or bright enough to really understand it, but am still amazed by what I know. 
But pain and evolution? That I wonder about. Whatever...on long dark winter days it's enough to give us food for thought.
Well if you think about it the concept is simple. What ever worked for humans and helped them survive. Was passed down among those individuals.
It just seems logical that humans who experienced great pain 
Therefore surviving and having children with the same traits more often than those who's pain was not as intense.S

You said, "would be much more apt to do things in a manner to limit the possibility of hurting ones self."
Could be.
I know a woman born with some kind of arthritis of the spine who is in pain 27/7, 365. She didn't "do" anything. There are untold numbers of cancer patients around the world near death and suffering pain they didn't bring on by doing something to hurt themselves. 
I don't know a lot about evolution, but from the little bit I've read about it it's a REALLY big book. 
But you might be right. Somewhere along the way we learned not put our hands in the fire, eat yellow snow, or argue with women.
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#26
I'm not feeling tense at all this morning. It's presently 70° and sunny here in Kihei. I'm having a cup of coffee in the backyard while listening to the birds and enjoying the gentle warm breeze. No tension whatsoever.
[Image: 2662bd28596c6d2314b0d4afc7cd0065.jpg]

Sent from my SM-G928V using Tapatalk
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#27
(10 hours ago)Scrapper Wrote: I'm not feeling tense at all this morning.  It's presently 70° and sunny here in Kihei. I'm having a cup of coffee in the backyard while listening to the birds and enjoying the gentle warm breeze. No tension whatsoever.  
[Image: 2662bd28596c6d2314b0d4afc7cd0065.jpg]

Sent from my SM-G928V using Tapatalk

Wonderful scene. Enjoy!
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#28
(Yesterday, 11:42 PM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(Yesterday, 01:58 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(Yesterday, 10:13 AM)Wonky3 Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 09:01 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(11-18-2017, 08:28 PM)Juniper Wrote: No, great pain wouldn't be necessary.  Just enough pain would keep most people safe. What I'm saying is, when an extreme traumatic injury or disease takes place, why doesn't enough dopamine kick in to help it out?
You are not arguing against me. You are arguing against evolution. If great pain was not necessary than people who experienced great pain would not have survived.
But they did so it most certainly was beneficial for those who had it, dealt with it and survived.Which includes all of us.
And like I said. Great pain is probably not as necessary as it was in the past and given time people who experienced less pain may survive in numbers enough to change things.

Curious and interesting. Evolution is thing to be amazed by, proving the resilience of nature and the wonder of what we have come to call "Natural Selection" (Darwin didn't). I'm not schooled or bright enough to really understand it, but am still amazed by what I know. 
But pain and evolution? That I wonder about. Whatever...on long dark winter days it's enough to give us food for thought.
Well if you think about it the concept is simple. What ever worked for humans and helped them survive. Was passed down among those individuals.
It just seems logical that humans who experienced great pain 
Therefore surviving and having children with the same traits more often than those who's pain was not as intense.S

You said, "would be much more apt to do things in a manner to limit the possibility of hurting ones self."
Could be.
I know a woman born with some kind of arthritis of the spine who is in pain 27/7, 365. She didn't "do" anything. There are untold numbers of cancer patients around the world near death and suffering pain they didn't bring on by doing something to hurt themselves. 
I don't know a lot about evolution, but from the little bit I've read about it it's a REALLY big book. 
But you might be right. Somewhere along the way we learned not put our hands in the fire, eat yellow snow, or argue with women.
IMO People who didn't do something wrong in order to feel great pain have zero to do with why we evolved to this point and still experience great pain.

You said "could be" and I "might be right". I don't want to argue but i don't see how I couldn't be right.
We evolved. To me that a fact beyond any dispute.
And EVERY single thing about us is the result of evolution. So I don't even see a possibility that Feeling intense pain is was not an asset during the time we evolved and is why we still experience intense pain today.
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#29
Man. Amazing how the simplest subjects become hyper complicated when discussed here. Really a unique place we have going on.
I've never known pain like I do now, because it is constant, not like hitting your thumb with a hammer.
Interesting too, because the perception is that males should be tough, resist pain, pull the dagger out and keep on marching. Truth is , chronic pain is a life changer and a life ended.
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#30
(4 hours ago)bbqboy Wrote: Man. Amazing how the simplest subjects become hyper complicated when discussed here. Really a unique place we have going on.
I've never known pain like I do now, because it is constant, not like hitting your thumb with a hammer.
Interesting too, because the perception is that males should be tough, resist pain, pull the dagger out and keep on marching. Truth is , chronic pain is a life changer and a life ended.

 I was just trying to say the reason we feel intense pain is NOT complicated. I just can't imagine any logical reason we evolved to feel intense pain unless that was more of an advantage than a disadvantage 

I didn't know you were still suffering. Sorry.
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#31
I understood you.
Not intolerable but no fun either. Kidney disease itself doesn't kill most people, but the problems caused, like no immune system,
mean most little ills become major.
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#32
(4 hours ago)bbqboy Wrote: I understood you.
Not intolerable but no fun either. Kidney disease itself doesn't kill most people, but the problems caused, like no immune system,
mean most little ills become major.

Does cannabis help the pain?
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