Just let kids be kids
#1
[Image: 45608350_1950954511637563_12121880417921...e=5C6478F7]

No Spiritual Surrender
November 13 at 7:54 PM ·
Parents; This is a reminder that within the next week your young child’s teachers are going to start telling them lies about how Columbus discovered America and try to dress your kids up as “Indians” for thanksgiving.
This is your advance notice to take this time to educate your children properly about history and how you can’t “discover” a place already populated with millions of people. Also, the guy never even stepped foot in North America. While you’re at it, explain to them why they should not dress up in “Indian” clothes for school. Raise a responsible and educated child. That’s the only way you improve the future generations.
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#2
I think dressing up like an Indian, honors Indians and their culture.

Perhaps we should tell them 'Native Americans' not Indians.

Explain how the word 'Indians' comes from a lost white guy, who had no clue where he was and wouldn't ask directions.
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#3
(11-15-2018, 03:45 PM)tvguy Wrote: [Image: 45608350_1950954511637563_12121880417921...e=5C6478F7]

No Spiritual Surrender
November 13 at 7:54 PM ·
Parents; This is a reminder that within the next week your young child’s teachers are going to start telling them lies about how Columbus discovered America and try to dress your kids up as “Indians” for thanksgiving.
This is your advance notice to take this time to educate your children properly about history and how you can’t “discover” a place already populated with millions of people. Also, the guy never even stepped foot in North America. While you’re at it, explain to them why they should not dress up in “Indian” clothes for school. Raise a responsible and educated child. That’s the only way you improve the future generations.

Poor Christopher.... not only is he dragged across the coals on "his" day.... he can't even catch a break on Thanksgiving.
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#4
(11-15-2018, 06:03 PM)chuck white Wrote: I think dressing up like an Indian, honors Indians and their culture.

Perhaps we should tell them 'Native Americans' not Indians.

Explain how the word 'Indians' comes from a lost white guy, who had no clue where he was and wouldn't ask directions.

I think dressing up like an Indian, honors Indians and their culture.


IMO I don't see how or why is dishonors them. But I'm told (on FB) by white people that there NA friends feel disrespected. I say get the fuck over it you crybabies.

Perhaps we should tell them 'Native Americans' not Indians.


I guess you meant CALL not "tell"? And yes that's pretty well known but I still don't know why the common way to refer to them as Indians is disrespectful. It's just inaccurate IMO.
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#5
Crying
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#6
Does it matter? They don't seem to play outdoors anymore anyway.
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#7
(11-15-2018, 06:15 PM)GCG Wrote:
(11-15-2018, 03:45 PM)tvguy Wrote: [Image: 45608350_1950954511637563_12121880417921...e=5C6478F7]

No Spiritual Surrender
November 13 at 7:54 PM ·
Parents; This is a reminder that within the next week your young child’s teachers are going to start telling them lies about how Columbus discovered America and try to dress your kids up as “Indians” for thanksgiving.
This is your advance notice to take this time to educate your children properly about history and how you can’t “discover” a place already populated with millions of people. Also, the guy never even stepped foot in North America. While you’re at it, explain to them why they should not dress up in “Indian” clothes for school. Raise a responsible and educated child. That’s the only way you improve the future generations.

Poor Christopher.... not only is he dragged across the coals on "his" day.... he can't even catch a break on Thanksgiving.

What's Columbus doing in my Thanksgiving day?
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#8
(11-15-2018, 08:54 PM)Juniper Wrote:
(11-15-2018, 06:15 PM)GCG Wrote:
(11-15-2018, 03:45 PM)tvguy Wrote: [Image: 45608350_1950954511637563_12121880417921...e=5C6478F7]

No Spiritual Surrender
November 13 at 7:54 PM ·
Parents; This is a reminder that within the next week your young child’s teachers are going to start telling them lies about how Columbus discovered America and try to dress your kids up as “Indians” for thanksgiving.
This is your advance notice to take this time to educate your children properly about history and how you can’t “discover” a place already populated with millions of people. Also, the guy never even stepped foot in North America. While you’re at it, explain to them why they should not dress up in “Indian” clothes for school. Raise a responsible and educated child. That’s the only way you improve the future generations.

Poor Christopher.... not only is he dragged across the coals on "his" day.... he can't even catch a break on Thanksgiving.

What's Columbus doing in my Thanksgiving day?

Yeah no shit..

I asked the people who posted and agreed with this.. what lies? Hasn't the story always been that the Indians helped the pilgrims and probably saved their lives?
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#9
(11-15-2018, 07:00 PM)tvguy Wrote:
(11-15-2018, 06:03 PM)chuck white Wrote: I think dressing up like an Indian, honors Indians and their culture.

Perhaps we should tell them 'Native Americans' not Indians.

Explain how the word 'Indians' comes from a lost white guy, who had no clue where he was and wouldn't ask directions.

I think dressing up like an Indian, honors Indians and their culture.


IMO I don't see how or why is dishonors them. But I'm told (on FB) by white people that there NA friends feel disrespected. I say get the fuck over it you crybabies.

Perhaps we should tell them 'Native Americans' not Indians.


I guess you meant CALL not "tell"? And yes that's pretty well known but I still don't know why the common way to refer to them as Indians is disrespectful. It's just inaccurate IMO.

Imitation is the ultimate form of flattery.

Does dressing like a Pilgrim disrespect white people?
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#10
NA's did and still do wear head dresses and beads. People and even NA's need their fucking heads examined if they see something wrong with it.
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#11
(11-15-2018, 10:49 PM)tvguy Wrote: NA's did and still do wear head dresses and beads. People and even NA's need their fucking heads examined if they see something wrong with it.

Headdresses in a ceremonial aspect. Not just walking down the street in full  war bonnet.
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#12


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#13
When I was in grade school, I remember NA's coming to perform at an assembly in the school gym, in full authentic garb and headdress, complete with drums, etc. It was amazing, it is not very often you can get 1st thru 5th grade to sit mesmerized and respectful of what they were watching. We were all also wearing headdress's that we created ourselves to be "part of the ceremony". Nothing at all disrespectful about that, quite the opposite. Afterwards, they mingled with us, let us ask questions, showed off their headdresses up close. I don't remember many specific days from elementary school, but that one has stuck with me. This notion that kids dressing up like an "indian" is disrespectful is beyond the pale in stupidity.

I'm sure by today's PC police standards, we were all a group of racist children in our disrespectful construction paper headdress's and the performers went on to suffer severe depression from seeing all those happy, smiling, children.
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#14
I'm not sure what to say about this topic.  I've talked to, or been talked to by, and read stuff showing the NA point of view. Sometimes it's a bit ridiculous (to me) I think, but I know it's not to them.  One time, about 25 years ago I was working in a school and the kids were  playing with these little fisher price dolls and one was an Indian with a feather bonnet.  The kids were playing with them.  There was a supervisor in the room who happened to be NA. She got pretty pissy that this little doll was there and insisted it be removed.  (funny, that little doll is probably worth money now, because you can't buy them anymore). She was always very pissy about how NA was represented in American Culture.  She had other things she would have issues about also.  Now in a book or film you can get proselytized about what the issue is, but in real life, I often find NA's to be kind of obscure when you try to engage them in talking about it. They seem to kind of keep you at arms reach and it almost feels like "Because I told you so." kind of reasoning.  That's not inaccurate.  Many NA's seem to have an attitude like that. I think they feel it's pointless to let the average non NA into their culture to a degree. There's a kind of wall that goes up that keeps you out.  I'm not sure I even disagree with that.  I have mixed feelings about how things are handled at times, but it's a very complicated  issue fraught with high emotions and sentiments.  So I just kind of stay out. 

I think the main thing I've taken away from talking about it with NA's is they are very sensitive about White people having the audacity to do anything that represents NA's.  American's don't know anything about their people, their customs or their traditions and misrepresent them constantly. (Their pov) so just don't even try.  They can be exclusive in their attitudes and there is a kind of "stay away from me" kind of mentality. Even amongst themselves. For instance an NA will have zero respect for you if tell them you are Indian or NA. Are you listening Elizabeth Warren? The first thing they are going to say to you is 'who are your people?'  because just having NA blood in your DNA is not enough.  You have to know your people and be able to name them.  (individually sometimes). You can't just say you are Sioux. You have to name your branch, your clan, your matriarchal lines and on and on.  Which I find kind of funny, because what if you don't know but what like to know and are trying to learn?  But I also understand their defensiveness and wanting to protect their identity as a people. It's just super complicated. There are layers and layers of stuff going on and that can't be distilled down to just one sentiment of whether or not it's appropriate to dress your kids up in macaroni noodles and paper bag representations.  To us it seems simple. Their attitude towards that would be: "Of course you would."

I'm just saying that on the other side of the issue, it's anything but simple.  You may not agree with that. And that's why they aren't discussing it with you.
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#15
This was posted just this morning. They attend a private school in an upscale area.
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#16
I'm a little offended to be referred to as pale face.   Dry
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#17
(11-16-2018, 12:56 PM)Cuzz Wrote: I'm a little offended to be referred to as pale face.   Dry

Nobody says that anymore, it's been replaced by melanin challenged.
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#18
(11-16-2018, 06:46 AM)Juniper Wrote:
(11-15-2018, 10:49 PM)tvguy Wrote: NA's did and still do wear head dresses and beads. People and even NA's need their fucking heads examined if they see something wrong with it.

Headdresses in a ceremonial aspect. Not just walking down the street in full  war bonnet.

Of course. Except maybe for these guys


[Image: 1153198c_93644383.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=1200]
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#19
(11-16-2018, 06:46 AM)Juniper Wrote:
(11-15-2018, 10:49 PM)tvguy Wrote: NA's did and still do wear head dresses and beads. People and even NA's need their fucking heads examined if they see something wrong with it.

Headdresses in a ceremonial aspect. Not just walking down the street in full  war bonnet.

Of course. Except maybe for these guys


[Image: 1153198c_93644383.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&w=1200]
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#20
(11-16-2018, 09:26 AM)GPnative Wrote: When I was in grade school, I remember NA's coming to perform at an assembly in the school gym, in full authentic garb and headdress, complete with drums, etc. It was amazing, it is not very often you can get 1st thru 5th grade to sit mesmerized and respectful of what they were watching. We were all also wearing headdress's that we created ourselves to be "part of the ceremony". Nothing at all disrespectful about that, quite the opposite. Afterwards, they mingled with us, let us ask questions, showed off their headdresses up close. I don't remember many specific days from elementary school, but that one has stuck with me. This notion that kids dressing up like an "indian" is disrespectful is beyond the pale in stupidity.

I'm sure by today's PC police standards, we were all a group of racist children in our disrespectful construction paper headdress's and the performers went on to suffer severe depression from seeing all those happy, smiling, children.

That's so good I want to repost your words on the FB page where I got this... OK? ... no name
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