Rotary Dial
#1
I just called a place of business, the answering system referred to "if you are dialing from a rotary phone please hold on the line....."

I mean really, is that not the most unnecessary stream of words that could be uttered on an answering system? How many people per day would even be calling from a landline let alone a rotary phone! If this or any business feels compelled to include this info in their system just be honest and say "if you are calling from a rotary phone, please hang up and join the year 2019"
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#2
(03-07-2019, 09:12 AM)GPnative Wrote: I just called a place of business, the answering system referred to "if you are dialing from a rotary phone please hold on the line....."

I mean really, is that not the most unnecessary stream of words that could be uttered on an answering system? How many people per day would even be calling from a landline let alone a rotary phone! If this or any business feels compelled to include this info in their system just be honest and say "if you are calling from a rotary phone, please hang up and join the year 2019"

I still have an old Ma Bell rotary desk phone, one of those able to withstand the end of the world. Don't ask me why.

I used it for longer then most because I could hear the ringer even from a deep sleep (I worked "on call 24/7" for most of my job). I also remember having to specify a pulse dial POTS circuit for the rotary phone from the phone company even back in the 1990's because they'd standardized on tone dial circuits by then. I don't know if you can even do that anymore.
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#3
(03-07-2019, 09:25 AM)Cuzz Wrote:
(03-07-2019, 09:12 AM)GPnative Wrote: I just called a place of business, the answering system referred to "if you are dialing from a rotary phone please hold on the line....."

I mean really, is that not the most unnecessary stream of words that could be uttered on an answering system? How many people per day would even be calling from a landline let alone a rotary phone! If this or any business feels compelled to include this info in their system just be honest and say "if you are calling from a rotary phone, please hang up and join the year 2019"

I still have an old Ma Bell rotary desk phone, one of those able to withstand the end of the world. Don't ask me why.

I used it for longer then most because I could hear the ringer even from a deep sleep (I worked "on call 24/7" for most of my job). I also remember having to specify a pulse dial POTS circuit for the rotary phone from the phone company even back in the 1990's because they'd standardized on tone dial circuits by then. I don't know if you can even do that anymore.

I stand corrected Big Grin 

But still, I think by now folks using a rotary recognize their extinct status and should not expect the world to make special arrangements to accommodate them.
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#4
(03-07-2019, 09:52 AM)GPnative Wrote:
(03-07-2019, 09:25 AM)Cuzz Wrote:
(03-07-2019, 09:12 AM)GPnative Wrote: I just called a place of business, the answering system referred to "if you are dialing from a rotary phone please hold on the line....."

I mean really, is that not the most unnecessary stream of words that could be uttered on an answering system? How many people per day would even be calling from a landline let alone a rotary phone! If this or any business feels compelled to include this info in their system just be honest and say "if you are calling from a rotary phone, please hang up and join the year 2019"

I still have an old Ma Bell rotary desk phone, one of those able to withstand the end of the world. Don't ask me why.

I used it for longer then most because I could hear the ringer even from a deep sleep (I worked "on call 24/7" for most of my job). I also remember having to specify a pulse dial POTS circuit for the rotary phone from the phone company even back in the 1990's because they'd standardized on tone dial circuits by then. I don't know if you can even do that anymore.

I stand corrected Big Grin 

But still, I think by now folks using a rotary recognize their extinct status and should not expect the world to make special arrangements to accommodate them.

Laughing Laughing  I should have been clearer, I don't actually use it anymore. I don't think I've used it since 2001 or so. It's pretty much a paperweight now.

Funny story though... even back in the mid 80's a neighbor kid wanted to use my phone to make a call. I said "sure, there it is". The kid picked it up the handset but then got a totally blank look on their face. They didn't ask a question or anything just put the handset back down and walked out. Rotary was obsolete even back then.
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#5
(03-07-2019, 10:29 AM)Cuzz Wrote:
(03-07-2019, 09:52 AM)GPnative Wrote:
(03-07-2019, 09:25 AM)Cuzz Wrote:
(03-07-2019, 09:12 AM)GPnative Wrote: I just called a place of business, the answering system referred to "if you are dialing from a rotary phone please hold on the line....."

I mean really, is that not the most unnecessary stream of words that could be uttered on an answering system? How many people per day would even be calling from a landline let alone a rotary phone! If this or any business feels compelled to include this info in their system just be honest and say "if you are calling from a rotary phone, please hang up and join the year 2019"

I still have an old Ma Bell rotary desk phone, one of those able to withstand the end of the world. Don't ask me why.

I used it for longer then most because I could hear the ringer even from a deep sleep (I worked "on call 24/7" for most of my job). I also remember having to specify a pulse dial POTS circuit for the rotary phone from the phone company even back in the 1990's because they'd standardized on tone dial circuits by then. I don't know if you can even do that anymore.

I stand corrected Big Grin 

But still, I think by now folks using a rotary recognize their extinct status and should not expect the world to make special arrangements to accommodate them.

Laughing Laughing  I should have been clearer, I don't actually use it anymore. I don't think I've used it since 2001 or so. It's pretty much a paperweight now.

Funny story though... even back in the mid 80's a neighbor kid wanted to use my phone to make a call. I said "sure, there it is". The kid picked it up the handset but then got a totally blank look on their face. They didn't ask a question or anything just put the handset back down and walked out. Rotary was obsolete even back then.

This is the only rotary phone my kids are familiar with. I think they still make this thing but it's newer and plastic, We still have a "vintage" one, made of wood, was my wife's when she was a kid. Still works, built to last in those days.

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRE9OcKYu13G1I_DEhBPYi...R2ON31wl_S]
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#6
I have a switch on my phone, so I can due the old rotary pulses, if I like.
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#7
Little kids love 'em. I used to grab them and give to the kids at work because they really loved them. There is something universal about phones though. Even though they'd never used one, they still knew to put it up to their ear and talk, even if it was upside down. Nowadays, kids use items as smart phones. They'll hold a building block in their hand and punch imaginary buttons and look at the 'screen'.
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#8
(03-07-2019, 10:26 PM)Juniper Wrote: Little kids love 'em.  I used to grab them and give to the kids at work because they really loved them.  There is something universal about phones though. Even though they'd never used one, they still knew to put it up to their ear and talk, even if it was upside down. Nowadays, kids use items as smart phones. They'll hold a building block in their hand and punch imaginary buttons and look at the 'screen'.

[Image: 207545e17c6fd3c2ee19e5400f3d796a--on-the...-funny.jpg]
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#9
Our oldest and her family have a cabin at Mt. Hood... we're here for the weekend. I just noticed this on the dining room wall....[Image: 3995f4d8a4c2e8c9c4f9cfb75b2157cc.jpg]

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#10
(03-10-2019, 09:59 AM)Scrapper Wrote: Our oldest and her family have a cabin at Mt. Hood... we're here for the weekend. I just noticed this on the dining room wall....[Image: 3995f4d8a4c2e8c9c4f9cfb75b2157cc.jpg]

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Cool. Was it originally there or was it put in to match the decor?

I've sold a few phones on ebay. Back when ebay was in it's infancy a lot of things had a lot more value than today.
Some people say the internet ruined the market. I guess so in a way. All it did was encourage more people than ever to search out items in attics, basements, yard sales etc and flood the market.

Wicker fishing creels use to be worth 200 bucks or more. Now maybe 40 bucks.

There are a lot of items one would think had a lot of value that don't because so many were made. Like these old phones. Old sewing machines etc.

I remember getting good money for a simple black Ma Bell rotary dial phone. And much more for any color especially red.
Princess phones are probably still worth a lot. Especially a pink one.
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#11
"Wicker fishing creels use to be worth 200 bucks or more. Now maybe 40 bucks."

Like this? This is my son-in-law's.[Image: 648cf2875db89dd93236700a719c7d94.jpg]

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#12
(03-10-2019, 01:10 PM)Scrapper Wrote: "Wicker fishing creels use to be worth 200 bucks or more. Now maybe 40 bucks."

Like this? This is my son-in-law's.[Image: 648cf2875db89dd93236700a719c7d94.jpg]

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That one is missing the latch and I see part of what used to be the shoulder strap. I think that might be a George Lawrence or a Myer and Frank?
Some ( very few) are still worth big bucks apparently to collectors.

Most are like the cheap one .....


   [Image: creel.jpg]

But a few like this are hot items. See if the makers mark is somewhere on your SIL's creel

   [Image: creel-2.jpg]



   [Image: creel-3.jpg]
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