What's in your garden?
#21
Tia Wrote:
Larry Wrote:I am very unskilled at this, so advise is welcome. Won't any old soil do?

Well, mine was tired. I noticed a definite down turn in how my garden was doing. I blame part of it to the trees getting big and not as much sun, but I think the soil was just worn out. No amount of fertilizer was doing the trick. So, I put straw and horse manure all over the front bed and over wintered it. OL got to see that. I should have put cardboard over it, but I didn't so now I'm turn, turn, turning it into the soil. I put on a lot of ammonium sulfate to 'cook' it. Finally it's working. The soil is breaking up and the clay from beneath is loosening.

I won't be planting peppers. For peppers, they want full sun, as much as possible. Even black plastic underneath them to increase the heat. That's why I won't plant them. I don't get enough sun.
Damn. Where I want to put it only gets morning sun.
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#22
Tia Wrote:I'm looking for a good heirloom tomato.

I've got lettuce! I planted the sugar peas yesterday.

Cletus you really have a huge garden!

Well "Medford" Tomatoes are sort of an heirloom? I guess It's one of several types that do very well in out climate.
I personally always plant Early girls also.
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#23
tvguy Wrote:
Tia Wrote:I'm looking for a good heirloom tomato.

I've got lettuce! I planted the sugar peas yesterday.

Cletus you really have a huge garden!

Well "Medford" Tomatoes are sort of an heirloom? I guess It's one of several types that do very well in out climate.
I personally always plant Early girls also.

What the heck is a "Medford" tomato? Early girl is a hybrid. I'm trying to find heirlooms.
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#24
Quote:What the heck is a "Medford" tomato? Early girl is a hybrid. I'm trying to find heirlooms.

Well Aren't heirloom tomatoes the ones that have been handed down that have acclimated to this climate or soil?

A "Medford" tomato is the name of a tomato that is commonly sold around here, I don't know if it's an heirloom or not but I'm simply telling you of a couple of tomatoes that WILL grow very well in this climate. And yes I know the early girl is a hybrid.
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#25
OK Tia , read this , it says that Medford tomatoe is on a list to become a HEIRLOOM.

YOUR WELCOME Big Grin

so where's a smilie with a tongue sticking out at you?... Razz


http://www.territorialseed.com/product/1159/225
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#26
tvguy Wrote:OK Tia , read this , it says that Medford tomatoe is on a list to become a HEIRLOOM.

YOUR WELCOME Big Grin

so where's a smilie with a tongue sticking out at you?... Razz


http://www.territorialseed.com/product/1159/225

Oh. Cool. Well, then thankyou. I just have never heard of a Medford tomato. Where do I get one? Smiling
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#27
tvguy Wrote:
Quote:What the heck is a "Medford" tomato? Early girl is a hybrid. I'm trying to find heirlooms.

Well Aren't heirloom tomatoes the ones that have been handed down that have acclimated to this climate or soil?

A "Medford" tomato is the name of a tomato that is commonly sold around here, I don't know if it's an heirloom or not but I'm simply telling you of a couple of tomatoes that WILL grow very well in this climate. And yes I know the early girl is a hybrid.


No, an Heirloom is a 'true to seed' plant. In other words not hybridized. So, the seed will produce the same plant as the parent. Not so with Hybrids. They are called Heirlooms because they 'predate' hybrids.

I once read that we don't really have any foods that are the same as our ancestors were eating 200 years ago. Hybridization and changes in raising techniques have completely altered the flavor of what we have now from what was available then. Try going to the store and finding a non hybridized corn seed. :wacko: Hard to do.
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#28
Quote:Tia...No, an Heirloom is a 'true to seed' plant. In other words not hybridized. So, the seed will produce the same plant as the parent. Not so with Hybrids. They are called Heirlooms because they 'predate' hybrids.

Makes sense, I was close Big Grin



Quote:Tia.... I once read that we don't really have any foods that are the same as our ancestors were eating 200 years ago. Hybridization and changes in raising techniques have completely altered the flavor of what we have now from what was available then. Try going to the store and finding a non hybridized corn seed. :wacko: Hard to do.

Well it's not all bad thing The flavor and size and shape of a lot of the original plants was not always good., I believe the original tomatoes were barely edible before man started messing with them.

Believe it or not I grew up in what used to be a small town ( Reynoldsburg Ohio) where a man named Livingston who credited with producing the first good tomatoes was from Big Grin Every year we had a Tomato festival.

Any was I guess he was the forefather of Heirloom tomatoes.
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#29
Tia Wrote:
Larry Wrote:I am very unskilled at this, so advise is welcome. Won't any old soil do?

So, I put straw and horse manure all over the front bed and over wintered it. OL got to see that.

That would be the same straw boy was trying to put, piece by piece, into my truck, so he could shoot his bow and arrows in our backyard.
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#30
That would be the same straw boy was trying to put, piece by piece, into my truck, so he could shoot his bow and arrows in our backyard.[/quote]

That's the one. Laughing
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#31
tvguy Wrote:
Quote:Tia...No, an Heirloom is a 'true to seed' plant. In other words not hybridized. So, the seed will produce the same plant as the parent. Not so with Hybrids. They are called Heirlooms because they 'predate' hybrids.

Makes sense, I was close Big Grin



[quote

Believe it or not I grew up in what used to be a small town ( Reynoldsburg Ohio) where a man named Livingston who credited with producing the first good tomatoes was from Big Grin Every year we had a Tomato festival.

Any was I guess he was the forefather of Heirloom tomatoes.

I don't agree with that. Ever try a wild strawberry. Much tastier. But.....First I should say, that when I'm referring to heirlooms I'm talking about old cultivars not hybrids. Hybrids require creating a new plant from two or more parent plants. Cultivars are developed. It is the old cultivars that are the heirlooms and they have superior flavor. Not always best looks or as disease resistant but an authentic flavor that we sometimes sacrifice to get the other results. If I could find a live plant of 'Medford' I'd certainly try it. I don't do good with trying to grow tomatoes from seed. I'd need a green house I guess.

To be 'heirloom' the plant or seed has to be able to reproduce itself. For example, one variety of tomato that has been saved for generation after generation of plantings will produce that same variety of tomato.

Heirloom seeds are always self-pollinated or open-pollinated and will produce plants with the same traits planting after planting, generation after generation. Hybrid seeds will not be able to reproduce plants with exactly the same traits.

The variety of seed must have been introduced at least 50 years ago, though some heirloom gardeners say they must be at least 100 years old. In recent years, however, varieties with shorter histories are considered heirloom because of their uniqueness.

So, I'm not talking tomatoes pre cultivation, just pre bio engineered or hybridized.
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#32
Tia is correct in that F1 hybrids will not grow the same plant from seed saved from the vegetable. There are however some varieties of veggies that will grow like the parent plant from the seed of the fruit. Most tomatoes that I have planted from last years seed or that volunteer are fine. The seeds from cucumbers and squash are completely different but that often has to do with cross pollination in the garden. I have allowed squash plants to grow from volunteers that turn out to be neither a zucchini of a cucumber or anything that is edible.
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#33
Cometmom Wrote:I will take all the tomatoes anyone wants to toss my way. I always try to plant a couple of cherry tomato plants but they never grow too well in a container.

Is oregano the herb that flowers out later in the season? If so, I have tons of that and will be giving it away later on.

I have mostly a flower garden. Love my roses and annuals.

I wish I had pictures of my tomatoes from last year. Here is your answer to container gardening, CM.

http://www.earthbox.com

I have 3 of these and we had more tomatoes last year than we could eat. Cherries, pear, slicing and heirlooms.

I bought a bunch of seed packs last weekend. I am debating either planting them or just putting them in bowls for the squirrels, rabbits and the gophers! The end result would be the same. Confused
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#34
Quote:TIA....I don't agree with that. Ever try a wild strawberry. Much tastier.



When you grow plants and select the best tasting ones to plant again you will come up with a better plant, that's how the tomato we know today was created. Yes I've tasted the wild straw berries and I think I have tasted hybrid berries that were as good or better.

I understand that hybrids may sacrifice one thing to gain another but I've grown a hell of a lot of different kinds of hybrids and quite frankly I don't know how some of then could have possibly tasted any better or had better meat , shape , size or amount of fruit.



Trust me on this I grew up in the tomato as we know it capital, the original tomatoes like many other fruits or vegetables SUCKED before humans started cultivating them and probably tasted like crap.

My wife used to volunteer for the Central point gleaners and the highs school would donate a lot of plants to them, eventually after no one would take them I would end up with them.

I would always get the weirdest oddball varieties because the ones that were left were the ones people had never heard of Big Grin

Here something weird, the volunteer tomatoes that grow from my hybrids are almost always cherry tomatoes :shock: :shock: what's up with that?
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#35
Here ya go Smiling ....

http://www.victoryseeds.com/Livingston/index.html

I grew up on Livingston ave Laughing Want to know Something else that is crazy,there is a town named that crazy coot Steve Pickering's family (the world forum) and it right next door to Reynoldburg :shock: Confused


Prior to his work, tomatoes were commonly ribbed, hard cored, and generally hollow fruit
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#36
Larry Wrote:I haven't had a garden in years, but this year I am going to grow peppers.

Green, yellow, orange, red. Jalapeno and cerrano.

These are the ones I use for my chili and other stuff. I might try some cilantro for breakfast stuff.
Plant a salsa garden. Peppers, onions and tomatoes. Not too much work but the result is fantastic. Smiling
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#37
tvguy Wrote:
Quote:TIA....I don't agree with that. Ever try a wild strawberry. Much tastier.



When you grow plants and select the best tasting ones to plant again you will come up with a better plant, that's how the tomato we know today was created. Yes I've tasted the wild straw berries and I think I have tasted hybrid berries that were as good or better.

I understand that hybrids may sacrifice one thing to gain another but I've grown a hell of a lot of different kinds of hybrids and quite frankly I don't know how some of then could have possibly tasted any better or had better meat , shape , size or amount of fruit.



Trust me on this I grew up in the tomato as we know it capital, the original tomatoes like many other fruits or vegetables SUCKED before humans started cultivating them and probably tasted like crap.

My wife used to volunteer for the Central point gleaners and the highs school would donate a lot of plants to them, eventually after no one would take them I would end up with them.

I would always get the weirdest oddball varieties because the ones that were left were the ones people had never heard of Big Grin

Here something weird, the volunteer tomatoes that grow from my hybrids are almost always cherry tomatoes :shock: :shock: what's up with that?


I'm not advocating or in favor of one or another. It's just that I happen to want the heirlooms. Also just pointing out the difference between a cultivar and a hybrid. I'm sure many uncultivated plants weren't too tasty before cultivation. But why not if I can? There are many kinds of heirlooms, not just tomatoes. I grow whatever I please. Lots of hybrid cucumbers, lettuce and others.

By the way, when you get volunteer roses, you get the original rootstock variety. Nothing special..
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#38
I'm not saying there is anything wrong with heirloom plants, I don't know if there are any that can fruit as fast which is why I buy them.

I bought a brandywine tomato plant once, it was a beautiful and weird looking kind of plant. It grew like crazy , if I would have had it staked I bet it would have been 10 feet tall Laughing . but the thing never put any fruit on.
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#39
tvguy Wrote:I'm not saying there is anything wrong with heirloom plants, I don't know if there are any that can fruit as fast which is why I buy them.

I bought a brandywine tomato plant once, it was a beautiful and weird looking kind of plant. It grew like crazy , if I would have had it staked I bet it would have been 10 feet tall Laughing . but the thing never put any fruit on.


Well, that's the reason for hybridization. Higher yields, more disease resistant, fewer problems like cracking. I'll probably get a hybrid too.
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#40
You are all so knowledgeable about plants and vegetables, it is impressive and informative.

I like to plant tomatoes and tend to my flowers in their pots. My DH loves horticulture but is too lazy to cultivate anything anymore. Dry
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