What's in your garden?
#41
So far haven't anything in our garden area except our cat, that thinks we are busting our butts tilling it up for her. "Other Half," staked out a much larger area, so have been trying to spade and shake out as much of the grass, which is going into the compost, in between the rains. Still will be only about 25 X 25 ft. but also need to get a fence around so we don't have to share with the neighborhood deer. Miss not having my kids around as they never used the words "I'm Bored," since they spaded the first part of the garden years ago, along with splitting and stacking wood. We'll see how our weed free Steer Manure works that we picked up for .99 a 1 cu. ft. bag. Hard to find anyone with seasoned manure anymore, that don't cost a fortune.
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#42
I'll probably plant tomatoes and peppers as usual, as I don't have a good space for anything else, and maybe some pole limas or green beans at the back where they won't shade everything else.

I doubt that selection for flavor will work very well outside of a hybridization program, as most of the commercially available varieties are 100% stable (i.e., clones) and the only variation will be environmental. Vegetable varieties for home gardens tend to be bred for eating quality, as well as good yield and adaptability to various climates. Those used by the food processing industry (and generally for fresh produce also) are bred for a high yield that is well concentrated timewise, resistance to bruising by mechanical harvesting equipment, and a pleasing appearance (as distinct from flavor).

I worked in an agribusiness industry for a number of years in the early 60's, when growers were trying to develop a bush variety of the Oregon Blue Lake green bean, which at that time was a pole variety harvested mechanically (mostly by teenagers earning next year's school wardrobe). I haven't followed up on this, but I suspect that most green beans are now harvested mechanically, and that they are inferior in eating quality to the older varieties. Maybe not. :roll:
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#43
Prospero Wrote:I worked in an agribusiness industry for a number of years in the early 60's, when growers were trying to develop a bush variety of the Oregon Blue Lake green bean, which at that time was a pole variety harvested mechanically (mostly by teenagers earning next year's school wardrobe). I haven't followed up on this, but I suspect that most green beans are now harvested mechanically, and that they are inferior in eating quality to the older varieties. Maybe not. :roll:

I was reading an article by an oregon bean grower. They were using bush beans which can indeed be harvested mechanically.
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#44
tagalong Wrote:So far haven't anything in our garden area except our cat, that thinks we are busting our butts tilling it up for her. "Other Half," staked out a much larger area, so have been trying to spade and shake out as much of the grass, which is going into the compost, in between the rains. Still will be only about 25 X 25 ft. but also need to get a fence around so we don't have to share with the neighborhood deer. Miss not having my kids around as they never used the words "I'm Bored," since they spaded the first part of the garden years ago, along with splitting and stacking wood. We'll see how our weed free Steer Manure works that we picked up for .99 a 1 cu. ft. bag. Hard to find anyone with seasoned manure anymore, that don't cost a fortune.


Don't you know it. I'm surprised you can get it for 99 a bag.
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#45
tvguy Wrote:I'm not saying there is anything wrong with heirloom plants, I don't know if there are any that can fruit as fast which is why I buy them.

I bought a brandywine tomato plant once, it was a beautiful and weird looking kind of plant. It grew like crazy , if I would have had it staked I bet it would have been 10 feet tall Laughing . but the thing never put any fruit on.

Interesting article here, TVguy. Not about hybrids or heirlooms but that original wild tomato:

http://www.bioneers.org/node/1526
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#46
Quote:Interesting article here, TVguy. Not about hybrids or heirlooms but that original wild tomato:

http://www.bioneers.org/node/1526

Thanks Tia Smiling Man I love fresh tomatoes, I'm going to do my best to buy some already huge plants and get them in the ground early so I can have ripe ones as soon as possible Big Grin

I have had ripe tomatoes by June a couple times but it's tough.
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#47
Tia Wrote:
tvguy Wrote:
Tia Wrote:I'm looking for a good heirloom tomato.

I've got lettuce! I planted the sugar peas yesterday.

Cletus you really have a huge garden!

Well "Medford" Tomatoes are sort of an heirloom? I guess It's one of several types that do very well in out climate.
I personally always plant Early girls also.

What the heck is a "Medford" tomato? Early girl is a hybrid. I'm trying to find heirlooms.

We've done heirloom carrots for the past two years and they are tasty and fun for our kids to harvest, they never know what color they'll pull up. I gave up on heirloom tomatoes, it's hard enough for me to get big ol' beef steak toms and yellow cherry.
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#48
Maybe there will be some nice started ones at the growers mart tomorrow.
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#49
I am not opposed to genetic engineered grains and other food crops. I am however trying to recall the particulars of the food riots in India when genetically modified grains were introduced that could not be used as seed grain. I welcome input on the issue but I seem to remember Monsanto was involved and because of it, became one of the most hated agri businesses on the planet.

I know that Monsanto green houses and Agricultural test fields are still being sabotaged by Indian farmers. The problem I believe is that Monsanto says that its genetically modified hybrid seed will produce more yield per acre, but the increase in yield is negligible and the real goal is to making seed saving for the following years farms impossible thus creating a continuous need to by genetically modified seed from Monsanto. Any input?
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#50
Nothing in my garden yet but I may break out the rototiller today if this nice weather holds up. Smiling
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#51
I went to the growers mart today. No sign of SWMNBN, although she promised in a PM to catch me there. I capitulated and bought two hybrids tomatoes, some feverfew and some greek oregano.
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#52
In the beginning there was dirt and Cletus looked out over it and saw that it was not good. Therefore he amended it with compost and organic fertilizer and ag lime. When he finished it was the beginning of the first day and he saw that it was now good.

On the second day Cletus visited Greenleaf Industries and was horrified to learn that the 6 pack veggies that had been a dollar were now four pack veggies for $1.25. This pissed off cletus so he shopped around and even considered a visit the forbidden store Walmart for cheaper veggies.

When Cletus got home he planted the veggies that he purchased and watered them in. The deer watched Cletus and smiled because they thought Cletus must surely be the nicest person in all the world. Then Cletus closed the gate.

Stayed tuned for days 3 thru 7 and photos. Smiling
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#53
cletus1 Wrote:In the beginning there was dirt and Cletus looked out over it and saw that it was not good. Therefore he amended it with compost and organic fertilizer and ag lime. When he finished it was the beginning of the first day and he saw that it was now good.

On the second day Cletus visited Greenleaf Industries and was horrified to learn that the 6 pack veggies that had been a dollar were now four pack veggies for $1.25. This pissed off cletus so he shopped around and even considered a visit the forbidden store Walmart for cheaper veggies.

When Cletus got home he planted the veggies that he purchased and watered them in. The deer watched Cletus and smiled because they thought Cletus must surely be the nicest person in all the world. Then Cletus closed the gate.

Stayed tuned for days 3 thru 7 and photos. Smiling

Laughing Laughing . . . Unsure Surprised Please tell me Cletus resisted temptation on the second day lest he sowed seeds of international evil! Sad Razz
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#54
Definitely want the photos.
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#55
TooAnxious Wrote:Laughing Laughing . . . Unsure Surprised Please tell me Cletus resisted temptation on the second day lest he sowed seeds of international evil! Sad Razz

I am all about resistance. Smiling
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#56
cletus1 Wrote:
TooAnxious Wrote:Laughing Laughing . . . Unsure Surprised Please tell me Cletus resisted temptation on the second day lest he sowed seeds of international evil! Sad Razz

I am all about resistance. Smiling

As we used to say in the SDS . . . Here! Here! Wink
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#57
I just counted my cool weather plants. I have 140 various lettuces and green leafy plants, including spinach and Swiss chard, 80 broccoli, 16 cauliflower and and two rows of peas. That should provide enough salad and greens for friends and family and one turtle. Nothing will be ready before mid May. Smiling
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#58
cletus1 Wrote:I just counted my cool weather plants. I have 140 various lettuces and green leafy plants, including spinach and Swiss chard, 80 broccoli, 16 cauliflower and and two rows of peas. That should provide enough salad and greens for friends and family and one turtle. Nothing will be ready before mid May. Smiling

Wow, your garden must be huge! Surprised Smiling
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#59
Javajabbers Wrote:Weeds of multiple varieties. Flowers that come back year after year designed to attract gazillions of bees that chase me out of my own yard. That, and - oh yeah! Algae in the pool right now. Surprisedops:

Are we related?

Kathy and I have been apartment dwellers for awhile, but our homeowning days were replete with such harvests as yours.

It's funny; my Grandad (yes, that's the way we spelled it) had the greenest thumb I ever saw. When he moved from his Klamath Falls place, we thought it was the end of his bounty-producing days. But he turned his single-wide mobile home space into a seemingly-never-ending garden. Flowers in the front; veggies in the back. It was truly amazing.

OTOH, I kill off my houseplants.
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#60
Finally, the sugar peas are poking through.
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